Latina poetry

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Latina poetry is poetry written by women of Latin American ancestry.

Many Latina poets live in the United States. Some are American immigrants. Others are born in the United States into Latin American families. Mexican-American women poets, Cuban-American women poets, and Puerto Rican women poets are examples of Latina poets.They often write poems code-switching between Spanish and English. Some Latina poets write mix English and Spanish into Spanglish.

The main Latina poets are Gloria E. Anzaldúa,[1] Giannina Braschi,[2] Sandra Cisneros,[3] Ana Castillo, Cherríe Moraga, and Lorna Dee Cervantes. Newer Latina poets include Ada Limon, Monica de la Torre, and Elizabeth Acevedo. Latina poetry has many different literary styles. Sandra Cisneros and Ana Castillo write lyric poems about families, migration, and borders. Giannina Braschi writes epic poetry about love, politics, and war.

Themes[change | change source]

Latina poetry has many subjects. Popular topics are love, family, immigration, exile, the Mexican border with the United States, and social justice.[4] Many Latina poets, including Ana Castillo, Julia Alvarez, and Judith Cofer Ortiz, write about their family, food, language, Latino culture, and their grandmothers.[5][6]

Latina poets[change | change source]

Related pages[change | change source]

Further reading[change | change source]

  • Floricanto Si!: A Collection of Latina Poetry, edited by Bryce Milligan and Angela de Hoyos. (Penguin, 1998)[7]
  • These Are Not Sweet Girls: Poetry by Latin American Women, edited by Marjorie Agosin (White Pine Press, 1991).[8]
  • FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Latin American poetry, edited by Ilan Stavans and Harold Augenbraum (2012).[9]

References[change | change source]

  1. Foundation, Poetry (2020-10-02). "Gloria E. Anzaldúa". Poetry Foundation. Retrieved 2020-10-03.
  2. Poets, Academy of American. "About Giannina Braschi | Academy of American Poets". poets.org. Retrieved 2020-10-03.
  3. "Sandra Cisneros - MacArthur Foundation". www.macfound.org. Retrieved 2020-10-03.
  4. "Hispanic Heritage Month: Recommending Latin American Women Authors". The New York Public Library. Retrieved 2020-10-03.
  5. Foundation, Poetry (2020-10-02). "Ana Castillo". Poetry Foundation. Retrieved 2020-10-03.
  6. "Poetry | Latino | Hispanic | Mothers | Grandmothers | Lee & Low Books". www.leeandlow.com. Retrieved 2020-10-03.
  7. The FSG book of twentieth-century Latin American poetry : an anthology. Stavans, Ilan. (1st ed.). New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux. 2011. ISBN 978-0-374-10024-7. OCLC 650212679.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: others (link)
  8. These are not sweet girls : Latin American women poets. Agosín, Marjorie. Buffalo, New York. 4 October 2016. ISBN 978-1-935210-74-0. OCLC 914219610.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: others (link)
  9. Zimmerman, Marc, 1939- (15 September 2011). Defending their own in the cold : the cultural turns of U.S. Puerto Ricans. Urbana. ISBN 978-0-252-09349-4. OCLC 785781226.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)