Legal opinion

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Legal and judicial opinions

Judicial opinions & aggregates for official decisions (O.S-Federal)

Majority opinion
Dissenting opinion
Plurality opinion
Concurring opinion
Memorandum opinion
Per curiam opinion
Seriatim opinion

In law, a legal opinion is usually a written explanation by a judge or group of judges that accompanies an order or ruling in a case.[1] Legal opinions may also be written by legal experts.[1] A legal opinion is used to lay out the rationale (reasons for) and legal principles for the ruling.

Opinions are usually published at the direction of the court. They may be used to reinforce, explain, change, establish, or overturn legal precedent. If a court decides that an opinion should be published, the opinion is included in a volume from a series of books called law reports or case reports.[2] Published opinions of courts are also collectively referred to as case law, which is one of the major sources of law in common law legal systems.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "What is Legal Opinion". thelawdictionary.org/. Retrieved 15 March 2016.
  2. "§ 2-200. How to Cite Judicial Opinions". Legal Information Institute, Cornell University Law School. Retrieved 15 March 2016.