Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina

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Lieutenant Governor of
South Carolina
Seal of the Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina.svg
Pamela Evette SC (cropped).jpeg
Incumbent
Pamela Evette

since January 9, 2019
Style
Term lengthFour years, no limit
Inaugural holderThomas Broughton (1730)
FormationSouth Carolina Constitution
SuccessionFirst
Salary$46,545 (2016) [1]

The Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina is the second-in-command to the Governor of South Carolina. The current lieutenant governor is Pamela Evette, who took office January 9, 2019.

List[change | change source]

Legend:   Democratic (32)   Republican (9)   No party (1)

Lieutenant governors of the State of South Carolina (1865 to 1868)
No. Lieutenant Governor Party Term in office Election Governor Notes
52   W.D. Porter Independent November 30, 1865

July 6, 1868
1865   James Lawrence Orr First popularly elected lieutenant governor
53   Lemuel Boozer Republican July 6, 1868

December 3, 1870
1868   Robert Kingston Scott
54   Alonzo J. Ransier Republican December 3, 1870

December 7, 1872
1870   First black lieutenant governor
55   Richard Howell Gleaves Republican December 7, 1872

December 14, 1876
1872   Franklin J. Moses, Jr. Second black lieutenant governor

Haitian-American
Lost reelection[a][2]

1874 Daniel Henry Chamberlain
- Disputed Disputed between Gleaves and William Dunlap Simpson.

Two governments were formed during this time.

56   William Dunlap Simpson Democratic December 14, 1876

February 26, 1879
1876   Wade Hampton III Succeeded to governorship[b]
1878
- Vacant until November 30, 1880
57   John D. Kennedy Democratic November 30, 1880

December 1, 1882
1880   Johnson Hagood
58   John Calhoun Sheppard Democratic December 1, 1882

July 10, 1886
1882   Hugh Smith Thompson Succeeded to governorship[c]
1884
- Vacant until November 30, 1886
59   William L. Mauldin Democratic December 30, 1886

December 4, 1890
1886   Hugh Smith Thompson
1888
60   Eugene B. Gary Democratic December 4, 1890

December 22, 1893
1890   Benjamin Tillman Resigned[d]
1892
61   Washington H. Timmerman Democratic December 22, 1893

January 18, 1897
1894   John Gary Evans
62   Miles Benjamin McSweeney Democratic January 18, 1897

June 2, 1899
1896   William Haselden Ellerbe Succeeded to governorship[e]
1898
63   Robert B. Scarborough Democratic June 2, 1899

January 15, 1901
  Miles Benjamin McSweeney Not elected
64   James Tillman Democratic January 15, 1901

January 20, 1903
1900  
65   John Sloan Democratic January 20, 1903

January 15, 1907
1902   Duncan Clinch Heyward
1904
66   Thomas Gordon McLeod Democratic January 15, 1907

January 17, 1911
1906   Martin Frederick Ansel
1908
67   Charles Aurelius Smith Democratic January 17, 1911

January 14, 1915
1910   Coleman Livingston Blease Succeeded to governorship[f]
1912
- Vacant until January 19, 1915
68   Andrew Bethea Democratic January 19, 1915

January 21, 1919
1914   Richard Irvine Manning III
1916
69   J.T. Liles Democratic January 21, 1919

January 18, 1921
1918   Robert Archer Cooper
70   Wilson Godfrey Harvey Democratic January 18, 1921

May 20, 1922
1920   Succeeded to governorship[g]
- Vacant until January 16, 1923
71   E.B. Jackson Democratic January 16, 1923

January 18, 1927
1922   Thomas Gordon McLeod
1924
72   Thomas Bothwell Butler Democratic January 18, 1927

January 20, 1931
1926   John Gardiner Richards, Jr. First elected to four-year term
73   James Sheppard Democratic January 20, 1931

January 15, 1935
1930   Ibra Charles Blackwood
74   Joseph Emile Harley Democratic January 15, 1935

November 4, 1941
1934   Olin D. Johnston Succeeded to governorship[h]
1938   Burnet R. Maybank
- Vacant until January 19, 1943
75   Ransome Judson Williams Democratic January 19, 1943

January 2, 1945
1942   Olin D. Johnston Succeeded to governorship[i]
- Vacant until January 21, 1947
76   George Bell Timmerman, Jr. Democratic January 21, 1947

January 18, 1955
1946   Strom Thurmond
1950   James F. Byrnes
77   Fritz Hollings Democratic January 18, 1955

January 20, 1959
1954   George Bell Timmerman, Jr.
78   Burnet R. Maybank Jr. Democratic January 20, 1959

January 15, 1963
1958   Fritz Hollings
79   Robert Evander McNair Democratic January 15, 1963

April 22, 1965
1962   Donald S. Russell Succeeded to governorship[j]
- Vacant until January 17, 1967
80   John C. West Democratic January 17, 1967

January 19, 1971
1966   Robert Evander McNair
81   Earle Morris, Jr. Democratic January 19, 1971

January 21, 1975
1970   John C. West
82   W. Brantley Harvey, Jr. Democratic January 21, 1975

January 10, 1979
1974   James B. Edwards
83   Nancy Stevenson Democratic January 10, 1979

January 12, 1983
1978   Richard Riley First female lieutenant governor
84   Michael R. Daniel Democratic January 12, 1983

January 14, 1987
1982  
85   Nick Theodore Democratic January 14, 1987

January 11, 1995
1986   Carroll A. Campbell, Jr.
1990
86   Bob Peeler Republican January 11, 1995

January 15, 2003
1994   David Beasley
1998   Jim Hodges
87   André Bauer Republican January 15, 2003

January 12, 2011
2002   Mark Sanford
2006
88   Ken Ard Republican January 12, 2011

March 9, 2012
2010   Nikki Haley Resigned[k]
- Vacant until March 13, 2012
89   Glenn F. McConnell Republican March 13, 2012

June 18, 2014
Resigned[l]
90   Yancey McGill[m] Democratic June 18, 2014

January 14, 2015
91   Henry McMaster Republican January 14, 2015

January 24, 2017
2014 Succeeded to governorship[n]
92   Kevin L. Bryant Republican January 25, 2017

January 9, 2019
  Henry McMaster
93   Pamela Evette Republican January 9, 2019

Present
2018 First elected on same ticket as governor[3]

Notes[change | change source]

  1. Gleaves lost by 359 votes. Initially, the Republicans claimed that the Democrats committed voter fraud and that their majority was invalid. However, Republicans lost electoral support and were forced to concede. Gleaves, by all accounts of sources, did not refuse to leave office as Governor Daniel Henry Chamberlain did.
  2. Succeeded to the governorship when Governor Wade Hampton III resigned to become a U.S. Senator
  3. Succeeded to the governorship when Governor Hugh Thompson resigned to become the assistant Secretary of the Treasury under the Grover Cleveland administration.
  4. Resigned to take position of associate justice on the South Carolina Supreme Court.
  5. Succeeded to governorship when Governor William Ellerbe died in office.
  6. Succeeded to governorship for five days when Governor Coleman Blease resigned to avoid attending the innaguration of his successor
  7. Succeeded to governorship when Governor Robert Cooper resigned to take a position on the Federal Farm Loan Board.
  8. Succeeded to governorship when Governor Burnet Maybank resigned to become a United States Senator.
  9. Succeeded to governorship when Governor Olin Johnston resigned to become a United States Senator.
  10. Succeeded to governorship when Governor Donald Russell resigned to become a United States Senator.
  11. Resigned after the South Carolina ethics commission charged him with 69 counts of using campaign money for personal use and 23 counts of failing to disclose campaign expenses during the 2010 election for lieutenant governor.
  12. Resigned to become the president of the College of Charleston.
  13. McGill was a Democrat while lieutenant governor, but he switched parties after leaving office.
  14. Succeeded to the governorship after Governor Nikki Haley resigned to become the United States Ambassador to the United Nations.

References[change | change source]

  1. "South Carolina state government salary". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 17 February 2019.
  2. Reports of Committees of the South Carolina House of Representatives. Columbia: South Carolina Government. 1876. p. 125.
  3. "SC voters in favor of governor-lieutenant governor ticket". wmbfnews.com. Retrieved October 31, 2013.