List of governors of Hawaii

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from List of Governors of Hawaii)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

This is a list of people who were the Governor of Hawaii.

Governors[change | change source]

The Republic of Hawaii was annexed by the United States in 1898. It became the Hawaii Territory in 1900. Hawaii became a state in 1959. The Republic had only one president, Sanford B. Dole. He was also the first territorial governor. Between 1893 and 1894, Hawaii was under the Provisional Government of Hawaii. It had no formal leader. Before 1893, Hawaii was a monarchy. Queen Lili'uokalani was the last Queen of Hawaii.

Governors of Hawaii Territory[change | change source]

Hawaii Territory was organized on June 14, 1900. It was a territory for 59 years. Twelve people served as territorial governor. They were chosen by the President of the United States.

# Governor Took office Left office Appointed by Notes
1 Sanford B. Dole June 14, 1900 November 23, 1903 William McKinley [a]
2 George R. Carter November 23, 1903[2] August 15, 1907 Theodore Roosevelt [b]
3 Walter F. Frear August 15, 1907[4] November 30, 1913 Theodore Roosevelt
4 Lucius E. Pinkham November 30, 1913[5] June 22, 1918 Woodrow Wilson
5 Charles J. McCarthy June 22, 1918[6] July 5, 1921 Woodrow Wilson
6 Wallace R. Farrington July 5, 1921[7] July 6, 1929 Warren G. Harding
7 Lawrence M. Judd July 6, 1929[8] March 2, 1934 Herbert Hoover
8 Joseph Poindexter March 2, 1934[9] August 24, 1942 Franklin D. Roosevelt [c]
9 Ingram Stainback August 24, 1942[11] May 8, 1951 Franklin D. Roosevelt [d]
10 Oren E. Long May 8, 1951[14] February 28, 1953 Harry S. Truman
11 Samuel Wilder King February 28, 1953[15] July 26, 1957 Dwight D. Eisenhower [e]
12 William F. Quinn August 29, 1957[17] August 21, 1959 Dwight D. Eisenhower

Governors of the State of Hawaii[change | change source]

Hawaii became a state on August 21, 1959. The state was made up of Hawaii Territory without Palmyra Atoll. Since then, there have been seven governors.

The governor is elected to a four-year term. It begins on the first Monday in the December after the election. The lieutenant governor is elected for the same term. Since 1964, they have been elected on the same ticket.[18][19] The 1978 constitutional convention set a term limit of two consecutive terms for both offices.[18] If the office of governor is vacant, the lieutenant governor becomes governor. If the governor is out of the state or unable to do their duties, the lieutenant governor acts as governor.[20]

  Democratic (5)   Republican (2)

# Governor Portrait Took office Left office Party Lt. Governor[f] Terms
1   William F. Quinn No image.png August 21, 1959 December 3, 1962 Republican   James Kealoha 1
2   John A. Burns John A. Burns 1966.jpg December 3, 1962 December 2, 1974 Democratic   William S. Richardson 3
  Thomas Gill
  George Ariyoshi
3   George Ariyoshi George Ariyoshi Portrait.jpg December 2, 1974 December 1, 1986 Democratic   Nelson Doi 3
  Jean King
  John D. Waihee III
4   John D. Waihee III John David Waihee III.jpg December 1, 1986 December 5, 1994 Democratic   Ben Cayetano 2
5   Ben Cayetano Ben Cayetano Portrait.jpg December 5, 1994 December 2, 2002 Democratic   Mazie Hirono 2
6   Linda Lingle Linda Lingle in March 2010.jpg December 2, 2002 December 6, 2010 Republican   James R. "Duke" Aiona Jr. 2
7   Neil Abercrombie Neil Abercrombie.jpg December 6, 2010 December 1, 2014 Democratic   Brian Schatz 1
  Shan Tsutsui
8   David Ige Hawaii Delegation (33949907131) (cropped).jpg December 1, 2014 Incumbent Democratic 1[g]

Notes[change | change source]

  1. Resigned to take a seat on the United States District Court for Hawaii Territory.[1]
  2. Resigned[3]
  3. Poindexter stayed in office for several months after his term ended until Stainback was confirmed.[10]
  4. Stainback had little power until October 24, 1944, because martial law was declared on December 7, 1941, after the attack on Pearl Harbor. This gave executive power to the military.[12] During the military rule, the territory was governed by Lieutenant Generals Walter Short, Delos Emmons, and Robert C. Richardson, Jr..[13]
  5. Resigned immediately when denied a second term by President Eisenhower.[16]
  6. All lieutenant governors have represented the same party as their governor.
  7. Governor Ige's first term expires on December 3, 2018; he is not yet term limited.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Confirmed by the Senate". The New York Times. November 24, 1903. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  2. "Carter Takes the Oath". The Washington Post. November 24, 1903. Archived from the original on September 21, 2008. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  3. "Gov. Carter will Quit". The New York Times. June 9, 1907. Retrieved February 2, 2008.
  4. "New Governor of Hawaii". The Washington Post. August 16, 1907. Archived from the original on September 21, 2008. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  5. "Approved as Hawaii Governor". The New York Times. November 30, 1913. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  6. All about Hawaii. Star-Bulletin Printing Co. 1960. p. 148. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  7. All about Hawaii. Star-Bulletin Printing Co. 1960. p. 157. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  8. "Judd is Inaugurated". The New York Times. July 6, 1929. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  9. "Poindexter Takes Office As Governor of Hawaii". The Christian Science Monitor. March 2, 1934. Archived from the original on September 21, 2008. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  10. Dyke, C.Y. (1960). Biographical Sketches of Hawaii's Rulers. First National Bank of Hawaii. p. 35. Retrieved February 23, 2008.
  11. Court Of Claims, United States; Company, West Publishing (1988). "Federal Supplement". 66. West Pub. Co.: 985. Retrieved February 22, 2008. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  12. Israel, Fred L. (August 1967). "Military Justice in Hawaii 1941–1944". Pacific Historical Review. 36 (3): 243. JSTOR 3637150. Retrieved February 23, 2008.
  13. Rankin, Robert S. (May 1944). "Martial Law and the Writ of Habeas Corpus in Hawaii". The Journal of Politics. The Journal of Politics, Vol. 6, No. 2. 6 (2): 213. doi:10.2307/2125272. JSTOR 2125272. Retrieved February 23, 2008.
  14. "Hawaii Swears in Long as Governor". The New York Times. May 9, 1951. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  15. "Hawaii Inaugurates King As Its Eleventh Governor". The New York Times. March 1, 1953. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  16. "Hawaii Governor, Denied 2nd Term, Resigns Suddenly". Los Angeles Times. July 26, 1957. Retrieved February 22, 2008.
  17. "Gov. Quinn Takes Office in Hawaii". The New York Times. August 30, 1957. Retrieved February 23, 2008.
  18. 18.0 18.1 HI Const. art. V, § 1
  19. Tuttle, Jr., Daniel W. (June 1967). "The 1966 Election in Hawaii". The Western Political Quarterly. The Western Political Quarterly, Vol. 20, No. 2. 20 (2, part 2): 563. doi:10.2307/446083. JSTOR 446083. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  20. HI Const. art. V, § 4