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List of Russian-language novelists

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of famous Russian-language writers who have written novels and/or short fiction.

Portrait Writer One of the most famous novels
Alexander Pushkin
(d. 1837)
Nikolai Gogol
(d. 1852)
Dikanka
Taras Bulba
The Overcoat
Dead Souls
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
(d. 1881)
Notes from Underground
Crime and Punishment
The Idiot
Demons
The Brothers Karamazov
The House of the Dead
The Gambler
"White Nights"
"A Gentle Creature"
"The Dream of a Ridiculous Man"
Ivan Turgenev
(d. 1883)
Anton Chekhov
(d. 1904)
A Dreary Story
Ward No. 6
The Duel
Peasants
Leo Tolstoy
(d. 1910)
Maxim Gorky
(d. 1936)
Osip Mandelstam
(d. 1938)
The Egyptian Stamp
Mikhail Bulgakov
(d. 1940)
The White Guard
The Master and Margarita
Heart of a Dog
The Fatal Eggs
Ivan Bunin
(d. 1953)
Dry Valley
The Village
Dark Avenues
The Life of Arseniev
Boris Pasternak
(d. 1960)
Doctor Zhivago
Monument to Nabokov at Montreux. Vladimir Nabokov
(d. 1977)
Lolita
Mikhail Sholokhov
(d. 1984)
And Quiet Flows the Don
Yulian Semyonov
(d. 1993)
Seventeen Moments of Spring
Chinghiz Aitmatov
(d. 2008)
Jamilya
The White Ship
The Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
(d. 2008)
Valentin Rasputin
(d. 2015)
Daniil Granin
(d. 2017)
Vladimir Makanin
(d. 2017)
The Underground, or a Hero of Our Time[1][2]
Baize-Covered Table With Decanter
Yevgeny Yevtushenko
(d. 2017)
Andrei Bitov
(d. 2018)
Anatoly Gladilin
(d. 2018)
Vladimir Voinovich
(d. 2018)
Oleg Pavlov
(d. 2018)
Yuri Bondarev
(d. 2020)
Eduard Limonov
(d. 2020)


Andrei Gusev
(born 1952)
Andrey Kurkov
(born 1961)
Kira Yarmysh
(born 1989)


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References

[change | change source]
  1. Nishanov, Yashin (30 May 2021). "Marginal Space as a Sign of the Path of the "Generation of the Forties" in V. Makanin's Novel "The Underground, or a Hero of Our Time"". The American Journal of Applied Sciences. 3 (5): 47–55. doi:10.37547/tajas/Volume03Issue05-08. S2CID 236542059.
  2. https://snl.no/Vladimir_Makanin. Store norske leksikon