Loki

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In Norse mythology, Loki, god of trickery (Anglicized (/ˈloʊki/)), Loptr, or Hveðrungr is a god or jötunn (or both).  By the jötunn Angrboða, Loki is the father of Hel, the wolf Fenrir, and the world serpent Jörmungandr. By his wife Sigyn, Loki is the father of Narfi and/or Nari. By the stallion Svaðilfari, Loki is the mother—giving birth in the form of a mare—to the eight-legged horse Sleipnir. In addition, Loki is referred to as the father of Váli in the Prose Edda. Loki is a shape shifter and in separate incidents he appears in the form of a salmon, a mare, a fly, and possibly an elderly woman named Þökk (Old Norse 'thanks'). He and Heimdall will fight each other at Ragnarök, both receiving fatal wounds, but Loki shall refuse to die until he sees the destruction of the world..

Loki