Manhattan, Kansas

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Manhattan, Kansas
Riley County Courthouse (2005)
Riley County Courthouse (2005)
Nickname(s): 
The Little Apple[1]
Location within Riley County and Kansas
Location within Riley County and Kansas
KDOT map of Riley County (legend)
Coordinates: 39°11′30″N 96°35′30″W / 39.19167°N 96.59167°W / 39.19167; -96.59167Coordinates: 39°11′30″N 96°35′30″W / 39.19167°N 96.59167°W / 39.19167; -96.59167
CountryUnited States
StateKansas
CountiesRiley, Pottawatomie
Settled1855
Incorporated1857
Government
 • TypeCommission-Manager
 • MayorUsha Reddi
Area
 • City18.79 sq mi (48.67 km2)
 • Land18.76 sq mi (48.59 km2)
 • Water0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
 • Metro
18.88 sq mi (48.89 km2)
Elevation
1,020 ft (311 m)
Population
 • City52,281
 • Estimate 
(2016)[4]
54,983
 • Density2,800/sq mi (1,100/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
66502–66503,
66505-66506
Area code785
FIPS code20-44250
GNIS feature ID0476378 [5]
Websitecityofmhk.com

Manhattan is a city in the state of Kansas in the United States. It is at the junction of the Kansas River and Big Blue River. It is the county seat of Riley County.[6] The city extends into Pottawatomie County. In 2010, 52,281 people lived there.[7] It is sometimes confused with Manhattan, New York.

The city was created by settlers from the New England Emigrant Aid Company. They created it as a Free-State town in the 1850s. This was during the Bleeding Kansas era. It is nicknamed "The Little Apple" as a play on New York City's "Big Apple". Manhattan is best known as where Kansas State University is. It is a college town.

Fort Riley, a United States Army base, is 8 miles (13 km) west of Manhattan.

History[change | change source]

Native American settlement[change | change source]

Before settlement by European-Americans in the 1850s, Native American tribes lived in the area.[8] From 1780 to 1830 it was where the Kaw people (also known as the Kansa) lived.[8] The Kaw settlement was called Blue Earth Village (Manyinkatuhuudje).[8] It was named after the river the tribe called the Great Blue Earth River. It is known as the Big Blue River. The river intersected with the Kansas River by their village.[8] Blue Earth Village was the place of a large battle between the Kaw and the Pawnee in 1812.[8]

The Kaw tribe lost their land in a treaty signed at the Shawnee Methodist Mission on January 14, 1846.[8][9]

1854: Polistra and Canton[change | change source]

The Kansas–Nebraska Act opened the Kansas territory to settlement by U.S. citizens in 1854. In Fall 1854, George S. Park created the first white settlement where Manhattan is. Park named it Polistra (some refer to it as Poliska or Poleska).[10]

In late 1854, Samuel D. Houston and three other people created Canton, a nearby community. It was near the mouth of the Big Blue River.[11] Neither Canton nor Polistra ever grew beyond their original founders.[8]

21st century[change | change source]

In 2007, CNN and Money magazine said Manhattan was one of the ten best places in America to retire young.[12] In 2011, Forbes said Manhattan was the best for "Best Small Communities for a Business and Career."[13]

Geography[change | change source]

Manhattan is at 39°11′25″N 96°35′13″W / 39.19028°N 96.58694°W / 39.19028; -96.58694 (39.190142, −96.586818),[14] or about 50 miles (80 km) west of Topeka on the Kansas River.

The United States Census Bureau says that the city has an area of 18.79 square miles (48.67 km2). Of that, 18.76 square miles (48.59 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[2]

Geographic features[change | change source]

Manhattan is in Kansas' Flint Hills region. That region has rolling hills covered in tall grasses. However, the downtown area was built on a broad, flat floodplain at the junction of the Kansas and Big Blue rivers. Manhattan is the biggest town in the Flint Hills. The Flint Hills Discovery Center is in Manhattan.

Tuttle Creek Reservoir is 5 miles (8 km) north of Manhattan. The lake was created when the Big Blue River was dammed to help stop floods in the 1960s. It is a state park that has many things to do. The Konza Prairie, a tallgrass prairie preserve owned by The Nature Conservancy and Kansas State University, is south of Manhattan.

Climate[change | change source]

Manhattan has a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfa). It has hot, humid summers and cold, dry winters.[15] The hottest temperature was 116 °F (47 °C) on August 13, 1936. The coldest temperature was −35 °F (−37 °C) on February 12, 1899.[16]

Climate data for Manhattan, Kansas (1981–2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 75
(24)
84
(29)
95
(35)
99
(37)
103
(39)
112
(44)
115
(46)
116
(47)
112
(44)
98
(37)
87
(31)
77
(25)
116
(47)
Average high °F (°C) 40.7
(4.8)
46.6
(8.1)
57.0
(13.9)
67.3
(19.6)
76.7
(24.8)
86.1
(30.1)
91.5
(33.1)
90.2
(32.3)
81.8
(27.7)
69.7
(20.9)
55.4
(13.0)
42.5
(5.8)
67.1
(19.5)
Daily mean °F (°C) 29.1
(−1.6)
33.9
(1.1)
43.6
(6.4)
54.5
(12.5)
65.2
(18.4)
74.6
(23.7)
79.9
(26.6)
78.0
(25.6)
68.8
(20.4)
56.5
(13.6)
43.1
(6.2)
31.2
(−0.4)
54.9
(12.7)
Average low °F (°C) 17.5
(−8.1)
21.3
(−5.9)
30.3
(−0.9)
41.7
(5.4)
53.6
(12.0)
63.0
(17.2)
68.3
(20.2)
65.8
(18.8)
55.8
(13.2)
43.2
(6.2)
30.8
(−0.7)
20.0
(−6.7)
42.6
(5.9)
Record low °F (°C) −31
(−35)
−35
(−37)
−12
(−24)
5
(−15)
23
(−5)
39
(4)
38
(3)
40
(4)
26
(−3)
13
(−11)
−9
(−23)
−22
(−30)
−35
(−37)
Average precipitation inches (mm) .67
(17)
1.09
(28)
2.49
(63)
3.21
(82)
5.04
(128)
5.72
(145)
4.57
(116)
4.12
(105)
3.43
(87)
2.60
(66)
1.70
(43)
1.06
(27)
35.69
(907)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 5.0
(13)
4.7
(12)
2.1
(5.3)
.1
(0.25)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
1.0
(2.5)
4.6
(12)
17.6
(45)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 5.0 5.6 8.0 10.0 12.5 11.7 9.6 10.1 8.6 8.1 7.1 5.5 101.8
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 2.8 2.3 1.0 .1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .7 2.6 9.6
Source: NOAA (extremes 1893–present)[16]

Tornadoes[change | change source]

The state of Kansas falls within an area sometimes called Tornado Alley. The most worst tornado in Manhattan was at 10:30 pm on June 11, 2008. Thirty-one homes and some businesses were destroyed by the EF4 tornado. The tornado caused about $20 million in damage to Kansas State University's campus. Some university buildings got a lot of damage. The tornado's winds destroyed the Wind Erosion Laboratory's garage.[17] No one was killed.[18]

Before that, the worst tornado to hit Manhattan was on June 8, 1966. The 1966 tornado caused $5 million in damage. It injured at least 65 people in Manhattan.[19][20]

Flooding[change | change source]

The worst floods in Manhattan's history were the 1903 and 1908 floods, the Great Flood of 1951 and the Great Flood of 1993.[21][22]

People[change | change source]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18701,173
18802,10579.5%
18903,00442.7%
19003,43814.4%
19105,72266.4%
19207,98939.6%
193010,13626.9%
194011,65915.0%
195019,05663.4%
196022,99320.7%
197027,57519.9%
198032,64418.4%
199037,71215.5%
200044,83118.9%
201052,28116.6%
Est. 201854,959[23]5.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[24]

Manhattan is the main city of the Manhattan metropolitan area. In 2014, there was am estimated 98,091 people living there.[25] It is also the main city of the Manhattan-Junction City, Kansas Combined Statistical Area. In 2014, there was an estimated 134,804 people living there. That would make it the fourth biggest urban area in Kansas.[26]

2010 census[change | change source]

In 2010, there were 52,281 people, 20,008 households, and 9,466 families living in Manahttan.[3]

Government[change | change source]

Downtown Manhattan, 2005

Local[change | change source]

Manhattan uses a council-manager system. It has a five-member City Commission. Elections are nonpartisan. They happen every other year, in odd-numbered years. Three City Commission positions are chosen in each election. The Mayor has the same voting rights as other Commissioners and does not have a veto.

Federal[change | change source]

Manhattan is in Kansas's 1st congressional district. Republican Roger Marshall represents Manhattan in the United States House of Representatives.

Economy[change | change source]

Manhattan's economy is based on the public sector. Kansas State University is the biggest employer in town. Its 24,000 students help support the retail and entertainment venues in Manhattan.[27] The second-biggest employer in Manhattan is the city school district.[27] Many civilians and military personnel are employed by Fort Riley. Many of them also live in Manhattan and support its economy, including more than 3,500 civilian Fort Riley employees.[27]

Historic businesses[change | change source]

Manhattan's Tallgrass Brewing Co was the biggest brewery in Kansas until closed in 2018.[28][29]

Education[change | change source]

The northern KSU campus in fall, 2005

Kansas State University is the biggest employer and educational institution in the city of Manhattan. It has about 24,000 students.[30] Kansas State University is the best among state universities in the United States in its total number of Rhodes, Marshall, Truman, Goldwater, and Udall scholars since 1986.[31]

Manhattan also has the Manhattan Christian College, Manhattan Area Technical College, the American Institute of Baking and The Flint Hills Job Corps Training Center, and the Kansas Building Science Institute.

Manhattan is served by USD 383 Manhattan-Ogden. It has one public high school with two campuses (Manhattan High School), two middle schools (Susan B. Anthony and Dwight D. Eisenhower), and eight elementary schools (Amanda Arnold, Frank V. Bergman, Bluemont, Lee, Marlatt, Northview, Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson). Manhattan also has two private school systems: Flint Hills Christian School (Preschool – 12th grade) and the Manhattan Catholic Schools. Manhattan Catholic School has two buildings, the grade school building (K-5)and the Luckey Jr. High building (6–8), formerly called the Luckey high building dedicated to Monsignor Luckey. The school's mascot is "Luckey the Cardinal".

Transportation[change | change source]

Airports[change | change source]

Manhattan Regional Airport (MHK) is 4 kilometres (2 mi) west of Manhattan on K-18. It is the second busiest commercial airport in Kansas. American Airlines and subsidiary American Eagle use the airport. It has multiple flights daily to Chicago's O'Hare International Airport and the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. It also does general aviation and charter flights. The nearest big commercial airports are in Kansas City (MCI) and Wichita, Kansas (ICT).

The former Union Pacific passenger depot in Manhattan has been repurposed as an event space

Rail[change | change source]

Domestic passenger rail service to Manhattan started on August 20, 1866. The Kansas Pacific Railroad built the first railroad there.[8] A railroad of the Union Pacific Railroad still goes through the city, but all passenger service to Manhattan stopped after the Amtrak took over passenger rail in 1971.

The Rock Island Railroad also used to go to Manhattan as a stop on Rock Island's Kansas City–Colorado Springs Rocky Mountain Rocket service.[32]

Public transportation[change | change source]

In Manhattan, there is a small public transportation system. It is provided by Riley County's subsidized paratransit service, ATA Bus. ATA uses four small buses and a number of minivans.[33]

Highways[change | change source]

Several highways go to Manhattan:

  • I-70 / US-40 runs about 9 miles (14 km) south of Manhattan. Three exits have a direct connection to Manhattan.
    • Exit 313 – K-177
    • Exit 307 – McDowell Creek Road
    • Exit 303 – K-18
  • US-24 goes through Manhattan.
  • K-177 goess north from I-70 as Bill Snyder Highway until the Kansas River viaduct.
  • K-18 is a major connector in Manhattan.
  • K-113 (Seth Child Road)

Media[change | change source]

Newspaper[change | change source]

The Manhattan Mercury is Manhattan's main newspaper. It publishes six days per week.[34] Other newspapers published in Manhattan include: the alternative weekly The Hype Weekly which focuses on events, arts, and culture in the area; the weekly Manhattan Free Press; the agriculture-focused Grass & Grain; and the K-State university newspaper, the Kansas State Collegian.[35] Manhattan has had at least one newspaper published for the town continuously since The Kansas Express published its first newspaper on May 21, 1859.[8]

Radio and television[change | change source]

Manhattan is a center of broadcast media for the surrounding area. One AM and ten FM radio stations are licensed to the city.[36] Manhattan is in the Topeka, Kansas television market.[37]

The first television station in Kansas was W9XAK in Manhattan. It was licensed to broadcast by the Federal Radio Commission on March 9, 1932.[38][39]

Sister cities[change | change source]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Hook, J. N. (June 10, 2014). All Those Wonderful Names. Open Road Media. p. 255. ISBN 978-1-4976-1186-3.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 12, 2012. Retrieved July 6, 2012. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. 3.0 3.1 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  4. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  5. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  6. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  7. "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved March 6, 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 Olson, Kevin (2012). Frontier Manhattan. University Press of Kansas. pp. 9–10, 25–27. ISBN 978-0-7006-1832-3.
  9. Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1904, retrieved August 28, 2013
  10. Parrish, Donald (2004). This Land is Our Land: The Public Domain in the Vicinity of Riley County and Manhattan, Kansas. Riley County Historical Society. ISBN 0-9677686-2-4. OCLC 54769277.
  11. Streeter, Floyd Benjamin (1975). The Kaw: The Heart of a Nation. New York: Arno Press. ISBN 978-0-405-06889-8. OCLC 2180188.
  12. "Best Places to Retire Young". CNN. Archived from the original on November 15, 2007. Retrieved October 2, 2007. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  13. Badenhausen, Kurt. "Slide Show: The Best Small Places For Business And Careers". Forbes.
  14. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  15. Peel, M. C.; Finlayson, B. L.; McMahon, T. A. (March 1, 2007). "Updated Köppen-Geiger climate classification map". Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions) (4): 439–473. http://www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/4/439/2007/hessd-4-439-2007.pdf. Retrieved January 25, 2012. 
  16. 16.0 16.1 "NOWData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Weather Service Forecast Office – Topeka, KS. Retrieved May 16, 2013.
  17. Wichita Eagle-Beacon[permanent dead link] Tornadoes rip Manhattan, KSU damage more than $20 million
  18. Hanna, John (June 13, 2008). "Kansas residents assess damage after deadly twisters". Associated Press. Retrieved June 13, 2008.[dead link]
  19. "City Officials set Damage at $5 Million". Topeka Capital-Journal. June 10, 1966. Archived from the original on May 17, 2008. Retrieved August 13, 2008. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  20. NOAA's National Weather Service. "The Topeka Tornado – June 8, 1966". Retrieved August 13, 2008.
  21. U.S. Geological Survey. "The 1903 and 1993 Floods in Kansas" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2008.
  22. Davis, Kenneth (1953). River on the Rampage. Doubleday.
  23. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 18, 2019.
  24. United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved October 23, 2013. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  25. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 – United States – Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Area; and for Puerto Rico". United States Census Bureau. March 2015. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved April 26, 2015. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  26. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 – United States – Combined Statistical Area; and for Puerto Rico". United States Census Bureau. March 2015. Archived from the original on April 4, 2016. Retrieved April 26, 2015. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 "Manhattan Community Profile (2016)". Manhattan Economic Development. Retrieved June 5, 2018.
  28. Hoedel, Cindy (April 12, 2014). "With throwback strategy, Manhattan's Tallgrass Brewing cans a winner". Kansas City Star. Retrieved April 21, 2014.
  29. Furnari, Chris (August 24, 2018). "Tallgrass Founder Performing 'Triage' as Kansas Craft Brewery Ceases Production and Lays Off Workforce". Brewbound. Retrieved July 16, 2019.
  30. "K-State media guide – Enrollment numbers 1990–current". Archived from the original (English) on September 10, 2018. Retrieved March 30, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  31. "Achievements" Kansas State University, Retrieved on April 20, 2009
  32. "Rocky Mountain Rocket" Schedule, Retrieved 15-3-11
  33. "ATA Bus" Archived August 5, 2012, at Archive.today Riley County, Kansas, Retrieved on April 8, 2009
  34. "Manhattan Mercury". Mondo Times. Retrieved December 16, 2011.
  35. "Manhattan Kansas local news media". Mondo Times. Retrieved December 16, 2011.
  36. "Radio Stations in Manhattan, Kansas". Radio-Locator. Retrieved December 16, 2011.
  37. "Topeka, Kansas (TV market map)". EchoStar Knowledge Base. Archived from the original on October 15, 2011. Retrieved November 18, 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  38. "Early Television Stations: W9XAK – Manhattan, Kansas". Early Television Museum. Retrieved February 24, 2014.
  39. "A U.S. Television Chronology: 1875–1970" (PDF). Retrieved February 24, 2014.

More reading[change | change source]

  • Olson, Kevin G. W. Frontier Manhattan: Yankee Settlement to Kansas Town, 1854–1894 (University Press of Kansas, 2012) 273 pp.

Other websites[change | change source]

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