Manuel Zelaya

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Manuel Zelaya
Manuel Zelaya 2022.jpg
First Gentleman of Honduras
Current
Assumed role
27 January 2022
PresidentXiomara Castro
Preceded byAna García Carías
(as First Lady)
52nd President of Honduras
In office
27 January 2006 – 28 June 2009
Vice PresidentElvin Ernesto Santos
Arístides Mejía (as Vice-Presidential Commissioner)
Preceded byRicardo Maduro
Succeeded byRoberto Micheletti[a]
Leader of Libre
Assumed office
26 June 2011
Preceded byParty established
Deputy of the Olancho Department
In office
25 January 2014 – 25 January 2018
In office
25 January 1986 – 25 January 1998
Personal details
Born
José Manuel Zelaya Rosales

(1952-09-20) 20 September 1952 (age 70)
Catacamas, Olancho, Honduras
Political partyLiberal Party (1970–2011)
LIBRE (2011–present)
Spouse(s)
Xiomara Castro (m. 1976)
Children4 (including Xiomara)
Alma materNational Autonomous University of Honduras (Incomplete)

José Manuel Zelaya Rosales (born 20 September 1952)[1] is a Honduran politician. He is the First Gentleman of Honduras since 2022. He is be the first First Gentleman in Honduran history. He was President of Honduras from 27 January 2006 until 28 June 2009.

On 28 June 2009, during the 2009 Honduran constitutional crisis,[2] he was captured by the military and sent to Costa Rica in a coup d'état.[1][3] On 21 September 2009 he returned to Honduras.[4] In 2010, he left Honduras for the Dominican Republic, an exile that lasted more than a year.[5]

He now represents Honduras as a deputy of the Central American Parliament.[6] Since January 1976 Zelaya has been married to Xiomara Castro de Zelaya, who is the 56th President.[7][8]

Notes[change | change source]

  1. Manuel Zelaya was deposed on 28 June 2009 and the National Congress swore in Roberto Micheletti.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Encyclopædia Britannica, Manuel Zelaya
  2. "Timeline: The Honduran Crisis". AS/COA Online. 12 November 2009. Archived from the original on 15 January 2011. Retrieved 22 January 2010.
  3. "Americas group suspends Honduras". BBC. 5 July 2009. Retrieved 5 July 2009.
  4. "Ousted leader returns to Honduras". BBC News. 21 September 2009. Retrieved 27 April 2016.
  5. "Zelaya goes into exile in Dominican Republic". Los Angeles Times. 28 January 2010. Retrieved 27 April 2016.
  6. "Media-Newswire.com - Press Release Distribution - PR Agency". Retrieved 27 April 2016.
  7. "Xiomara Castro poised to become first female president of Honduras". the Guardian. 2021-11-29. Retrieved 2021-11-30.
  8. "Honduras set for first female president as Castro holds wide lead". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 2021-11-30.