This person won a Nobel Prize

Martin Karplus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Martin Karplus
Nobel Prize Laureate Martin Karplus during press conference in Stockholm, December 2013
Born March 15, 1930 (1930-03-15) (age 87)
Vienna, Austria[1]
Citizenship American, Austrian[1]
Institutions
Alma mater
Doctoral advisor Linus Pauling[1]
Notable awards

Martin Karplus (born March 15, 1930) is an Austrian-born American theoretical chemist. He is the Theodore William Richards Professor of Chemistry, emeritus at Harvard University. He is also Director of the Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory. He is of Jewish descent.

Karplus received the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, together with Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel, for "the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems".[1][2][3][4][5][6]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (October 9, 2013). "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2013". Press release. http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/2013/press.html. Retrieved October 9, 2013.
  2. Chang, Kenneth (October 9, 2013). "3 Researchers Win Nobel Prize in Chemistry". New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/10/science/three-researchers-win-nobel-prize-in-chemistry.html. Retrieved October 9, 2013.
  3. Fersht, A. R. (2013). "Profile of Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel, 2013 nobel laureates in chemistry". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110 (49): 19656-7. doi:10.1073/pnas.1320569110. PMC 3856823. PMID 24277833.
  4. Hodak, Hélène (2014). "The Nobel Prize in chemistry 2013 for the development of multiscale models of complex chemical systems: A tribute to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel". Journal of Molecular Biology 426 (1): 1-3. doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2013.10.037. PMID 24184197.
  5. Van Noorden, R. (2013). "Computer modellers secure chemistry Nobels". Nature. doi:10.1038/nature.2013.13903.
  6. Van Noorden, Richard (2013). "Modellers react to chemistry award: Nobel Prize proves that theorists can measure up to experimenters". Nature 502 (7471): 280. doi:10.1038/502280a.

Other websites[change | change source]