Monoceros

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Monoceros
Monoceros
Click for larger image
List of stars in Monoceros
Abbreviation: Mon
Genitive: Monocerotis
Symbology:
Right ascension: 7.15 h
Declination: −5.74°
Area: 482 sq. deg. (35th)
Main stars: 4
Bayer/Flamsteed stars: 32
Stars known to have planets: 16
Bright stars: 0
Nearby stars: 2
Brightest star: β Mon (3.76m)
Nearest star: Ross 614 ( ly)
Messier objects: 1
Meteor showers: December Monocerids
Alpha Monocerids
Bordering constellations: Canis Major
Canis Minor
Gemini
Hydra
Lepus
Orion
Puppis
Visible at latitudes between +75° and −90°
Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of February

Monoceros (Greek: Μονόκερως) is a constellation on the celestial equator.[1] Its name is Greek for unicorn. It was described by 17th-century Dutch cartographer Petrus Plancius. Orion is to the west of Monceros. Gemini is to the north. Canis Major is to the south. Hydra is to the east. Other constellations next to Monoceros are Canis Minor, Lepus and Puppis.

Notable features[change | change source]

The constellation Monoceros as it can be seen by the naked eye.

Stars[change | change source]

Monoceros is hard to see with the naked eye. Its brightest star, Alpha Monocerotis, has a visual magnitude of 3.93. It is brighter than Gamma Monocerotis at 3.98.

Monoceros does have some interesting features to look at with a small telescope. Beta Monocerotis is a triple star system. The three stars form a triangle which looks to be in one spot. William Herschel commented that it is "one of the most beautiful sights in the heavens".[2]

Monoceros also has Plaskett's Star. It is a big binary system. Its whole mass is said to be that of almost 100 Suns put together.

References[change | change source]

Further reading[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]