Naturalism (literature)

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Naturalism was a 19th century literary movement. It was a development of the realism movement. Realism attempted to show subjects as they actually were, honestly and naturally. Naturalism added scientific elements such as environment and heredity to fictional characters.[1] Unlike realism, naturalism used characters who were of the lower classes. It was also known for themes including taboo and violence.[2] Émile Zola was the best-known writer of the literary school of naturalism. He was joined by other writers such as Gustave Flaubert, and Alphonse Daudet.

References[change | change source]

  1. Richard Daniel Lehan, Realism and Naturalism: The Novel in an Age of Transition (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2005), p. 3
  2. "Compare and Contrast: The Similarities and Differences between Realism and Naturalism". HubPages Inc. 2 December 2010. Retrieved 13 October 2014.