Naturopathy

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Naturopathy is a form of alternative medicine. It is based on the belief that a special energy called "vital energy" guides bodily functions such as metabolism, reproduction and growth.[1] Naturopaths mostly use holistic forms of treatment. They generally avoid the use of surgery and drugs. Many naturopaths reject modern science.

Naturopathy is not supported by science.[2] The medical community does not believe that it works.[2][3]

The term "naturopathy" comes from Greek and Latin. It means "nature disease".[4] Modern naturopathy developed from the Natural Cure movement in Europe.[5][6]

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  1. Sarris, Jerome; Wardle, Jon (2010). Clinical Naturopathy: An evidence-based guide to practice. Sydney: Churchill Livingstone / Elsevier Health Sciences. pp. 32–36. ISBN 9780729579261. Retrieved 2013-09-01.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Jagtenberg, Tom; Evans, Sue; Grant, Airdre; Howden, Ian (April 2006). "Evidence-based medicine and naturopathy". Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine 12 (3): 323–328. doi:10.1089/acm.2006.12.323. PMID 16646733. https://works.bepress.com/airdre_grant/4/download/. 
  3. Jarvis, William T. (January 30, 2001) [copyright 1997]. "NCAHF Fact Sheet on Naturopathy". National Council Against Health Fraud. Retrieved 2009-04-17.
  4. "Naturopathy: An Introduction". National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Health and Human Services. March 2012 [created April 2007]. Retrieved 2013-03-16.
  5. Brown, P.S. (April 1, 1988). "Nineteenth-century American health reformers and the early nature cure movement in Britain". Medical History 32 (2): 174–194. PMC 1139856. PMID 3287059. 
  6. Langley, Stephen. "History of Naturopathy". College of Naturopathic Medicine website. UK.

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