Ojibwe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Ojibwe (Chippewa)
Ojibwe Language Map.png
Pre-contact distribution of Ojibwe-speaking people
Total population
170,742 in United States (2010)[1]
Regions with significant populations
Canada (Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta)
United States (Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota)
Languages
English, Ojibwe, French
Religion
Midewiwin, Catholicism, Methodism
Related ethnic groups
Odawa, Potawatomi, Saulteaux, Oji-Cree, and other Algonquian peoples

The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa, or Saulteaux are an Anishinaabe people of Canada and the United States. They are one of the biggest indigenous peoples north of the Rio Grande. In Canada, they are the second-biggest First Nations group. The only group bigger are the Cree. In the United States, they have the fifth-biggest number of people among Native American peoples. The only groups bigger are the Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw and Sioux.

most of the Ojibwe people live in the United States. There are 77,940 mainline Ojibwe; 76,760 Saulteaux; and 8,770 Mississauga, organized in 125 bands. They live from western Quebec to eastern British Columbia. As of 2010, the US census says that there are 170,742 Ojibwe people.[1]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "CDC - American - Indian - Alaska - Native - Populations - Racial - Ethnic - Minorities - Minority Health". 2 December 2012. Archived from the original on 2 December 2012.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)

Other websites[change | change source]