Olathe, Kansas

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Olathe, Kansas
Olathe City Hall
Olathe City Hall
Flag of Olathe, Kansas
Flag
Location within Johnson County and Kansas
Location within Johnson County and Kansas
KDOT map of Johnson County (legend)
Coordinates: 38°52′53″N 94°49′9″W / 38.88139°N 94.81917°W / 38.88139; -94.81917Coordinates: 38°52′53″N 94°49′9″W / 38.88139°N 94.81917°W / 38.88139; -94.81917
CountryUnited States
StateKansas
CountyJohnson
Founded1857
Incorporated1857, 1868 [1]
Government
 • TypeMayor–Council
 • MayorMichael Copeland
Area
 • City and County seat60.42 sq mi (156.49 km2)
 • Land59.66 sq mi (154.52 km2)
 • Water0.76 sq mi (1.97 km2)  1.26%
Elevation
1,037 ft (316 m)
Population
 • City and County seat125,872
 • Estimate 
(2018)[4]
139,605
 • RankUS: 191st
 • Density2,100/sq mi (800/km2)
 • Metro
2,087,471 (US: 29th)
Time zoneUTC-6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP codes
66051,66061,66062,66063
Area code913
FIPS code20-52575
GNIS ID479198[5]
Websiteolatheks.org

Olathe is a city in Johnson County, Kansas, United States. It is also the county seat of Johnson County.[6] In 2010, 125,872 people lived in Olathe. It is the fourth biggest city in Kansas.[7] By 2018, the Census Bureau estimated 139,605 people lived in Olathe.[8]

History[change | change source]

Johnson County Courthouse in Olathe

19th century[change | change source]

Olathe was created by Dr. John T. Barton in Spring 1857. He came to the center of Johnson County, Kansas. He later told about his ride to friends: "...the prairie was covered with verbena and other wild flowers. I kept thinking the land was beautiful and that I should name the town Beautiful."[source?] Purportedly, Barton asked a Shawnee interpreter how to say "Beautiful" in his native language. The interpreter responded, "Olathe."[9]

Olathe was incorporated in 1857.[10] It was not the first city in Johnson County. Because it grew very quickly, it became the county seat in October 1859.[9] Growing hatred across the United States about the issue of slavery led to many fights between abolitionist settlers and nearby slave state Missouri. These fights would grow, and they would become a part of the bigger fight known as Bleeding Kansas. When Kansas became a state in 1861, it was a free state. When it became a state, violence stopped. Peace, however, would continue to elude Olathe for many years to come. In 1861 Union officials and local military forces created a military post in the city. It had one company of soldiers, and it had the local militia.

On September 6, 1862, William Quantrill led guerrilla Confederate soldiers in an attack against Olathe. A half dozen people died, and most of the city was destroyed. Quantrill captured the outpost, and he tried forcing the men to fight for the Confederacy.[11][12][13] Kansas militia continued to stay in the Olathe military post for the rest of the Civil War.

Confederate soldiers would try to attack Olathe two more times. The first time happened on August 20–21, 1863 as Quantrill was going through on his way to Lawrence, Kansas (see Lawrence Massacre). The second raid happened on October 24-5, 1864, when Confederate Major General Sterling Price with 10,000 men went through on their retreat South (see Price's Raid).[14][15][16]

When the Confederates surrendered, the military post was ended in August 1865.[17]

21st century[change | change source]

In 2008, the U.S. Census Bureau said Olathe was the 24th fastest-growing city in the United States.[18][19] The same year, CNN/Money and Money magazine said Olathe was #11 on its list of the "100 Best Cities to Live in the United States."[20]

On February 22, 2017, Adam Purinton said racial things and shot at crowded Austins Bar and Grill in southern Olathe. He shot and injured three people. One person died. The victims were Alok Madasani, Srinivas Kuchibhotla, and Ian Grillot. Purinton was later arrested in Clinton, Missouri. He was charged with one count of first-degree murder and two counts of attempted first-degree murder. This shooting got international attention because two of the victims were Indian.[21]

Geography[change | change source]

The United States Census Bureau says that the city has a total area of 60.42 square miles (156.49 km2). Of that, 59.66 square miles (154.52 km2) is land and 0.76 square miles (1.97 km2) is water.[2] Olathe has two public lakes: Lake Olathe and Cedar Lake with 45 acres (0.18 km2).

Olathe's Black Bob Park is named after Hathawekela Shawnee Chief Black Bob.[22]

Weather[change | change source]

Olathe has a humid continental climate. It has cold winters and hot summers. Temperatures range from an average high of 39 °F (4 °C) and low 20 °F (−7 °C) in January to an average high of nearly 90 °F (32 °C) in July. The temperature reaches 90 °F (32 °C) an average of 36 days per year and 100 °F (38 °C) an average of 3 days per year. The minimum temperature falls below freezing (32 °F) on average of 102 days per year. It does not go below 10 °F (−12 °C) very often.

The area gets about 40 inches (1,000 mm) of precipitation during an average year. Most of the rain happens in May and June.

Source: Monthly Station Climate Summaries, 1971–2000, U.S. National Climatic Data Center
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Temperatures (°F)
Mean high 39.3 43.8 55.1 65.7 74.6 84.3 89.4 87.8 79.1 68.3 53.8 42.0 65.7
Mean low 19.9 24.3 33.7 43.8 54.9 63.8 68.6 66.6 58.3 47.3 33.8 23.2 45.3
Highest recorded 74
(1950)
81
(1972)
85
(1995)
91
(1987)
95
(1956)
105
(1980)
114
(1954)
107
(2000)
106
(2000)
98
(1939)
84
(1978)
76
(1939)
114
(1954)
Lowest recorded −18
(1943)
−29
(1899)
−8
(1978)
13
(1975)
30
(1976)
43
(1982)
48
(1972)
46
(1986)
30
(1942)
18
(1993)
1
(1959)
−22
(1989)
−29
(1899)
Precipitation (inches)
Median 1.20 1.15 2.12 3.52 4.97 4.96 3.42 3.07 3.76 3.59 2.77 1.45 35.98
Mean number of days 6.0 5.7 8.6 9.8 11.4 9.2 8.2 8.4 7.7 7.7 7.2 6.5 96.4
Highest monthly 3.31
(1982)
3.94
(1997)
10.41
(1973)
10.11
(1994)
12.35
(1990)
13.40
(1984)
15.59
(1993)
7.76
(1985)
14.65
(1986)
7.82
(1985)
8.51
(1992)
4.89
(1992)
Snowfall (inches)
Median 5.5 4.5 2.8 0.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 1.6 4.3 19.2
Mean number of days 3.0 2.4 1.4 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.8 2.1 10.0
Highest monthly 20.5
(1979)
14.0
(1993)
13.5
(1978)
3.0
(1979)
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.5
(1996)
8.0
(1975)
11.3
(1983)
Notes: Temperatures are in degrees Fahrenheit. Precipitation includes rain and melted snow or sleet in inches; median values are provided for precipitation and snowfall because mean averages may be misleading. Mean and median values are for the 30-year period 1971–2000; temperature extremes are for the station's period of record (1939–2001). The station is located three miles (5 km) east of Olathe at 38°53′N 94°46′W, elevation 1,055 feet (322 m).
Climate data for Olathe, Kansas
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 39.3
(4.1)
43.8
(6.6)
55.1
(12.8)
65.7
(18.7)
74.6
(23.7)
84.3
(29.1)
89.4
(31.9)
87.8
(31.0)
79.1
(26.2)
68.3
(20.2)
53.8
(12.1)
42.0
(5.6)
65.7
(18.7)
Average low °F (°C) 19.9
(−6.7)
24.3
(−4.3)
33.7
(0.9)
43.8
(6.6)
54.9
(12.7)
63.8
(17.7)
68.6
(20.3)
66.6
(19.2)
58.3
(14.6)
47.3
(8.5)
33.8
(1.0)
23.2
(−4.9)
45.3
(7.4)
[source?]

People[change | change source]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18701,817
18802,28525.8%
18903,29444.2%
19003,4514.8%
19103,272−5.2%
19203,268−0.1%
19303,65611.9%
19403,9798.8%
19505,59340.6%
196010,98796.4%
197017,92163.1%
198037,258107.9%
199063,44070.3%
200092,96246.5%
2010125,87235.4%
Est. 2018139,605[4]10.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[23]

2010 census[change | change source]

The 2010 census says that there were 125,872 people, 44,507 households, and 33,274 families living in Olathe.[3]

Economy[change | change source]

The headquarters of Garmin, a company famous for making GPS systems, is in Olathe.[24]

Biggest employers[change | change source]

The city's 2015 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report says that the biggest employers in the city are:[25]

# Employer # of Employees
1 Olathe Unified School District 4,500
2 GARMIN International 2,723
3 Farmers Insurance 2,600
4 Olathe Medical Center 2,500
5 Johnson County 2,147
6 Convergys 950
7 City of Olathe 865
8 Honeywell (Bendix/King) 850
9 Mid-Central Sysco 780
10 TransAm Trucking 750

Sister cities[change | change source]

Friendship cities[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Olathe was incorporated in 1857 under a charter from the 'Bogus Legislature.' ... Some doubts existed as to the legality of the incorporation and it was re-incorporated in 1868 as a city of the third class...." —Blackmar, Frank W., ed. "Olathe". Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... Vol. II. Standard Pub. Co. (Chicago: 1912) pp. 386–387.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-07-06.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 16, 2019.
  5. "Olathe". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  6. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  7. "Census 2010 News | U.S. Census Bureau Delivers Kansas' 2010 Census Population Totals, Including First Look at Race and Hispanic Origin Data for Legislative Redistricting". 2010.census.gov. 2011 [last update]. Retrieved March 5, 2011. Check date values in: |year= (help)
  8. "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Olathe city, Kansas". Census Bureau QuickFacts. Retrieved 2019-10-17.
  9. 9.0 9.1 "Evolution of Olathe". City of Olathe. Archived from the original on September 28, 2007.
  10. Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Volume 2. Standard Publishing Company. p. 386.
  11. William E. Connelley, Quantrill and the Border Wars (Cedar Rapids, Iowa: Torch Press, 1909), pp. 234, 271. This book may also be found on the Internet Archive website, at https://archive.org/stream/quantrillborderw00connuoft/quantrillborderw00connuoft_djvu.txt .
  12. Capt. James Christian, report, The War of the Rebellion (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1899), Series II, Vol. IV, p. 721.
  13. John W. Noble, letter, The War of the Rebellion, Series II, Vol. IV, pp. 721-2.
  14. Connelley, pp. 397-8.
  15. First Lieut. Cyrus Leland, report, The War of the Rebellion (1883), Series I, Vol. XXII, Part I, pp. 591-2.
  16. Brig. Gen. W. H. M. Fishback, report, The War of the Rebellion (1893), Series I, Vol. XLI, Part I, p. 619.
  17. Maj. Gen. John Pope, report, The War of the Rebellion (1896), Series I, Vol. XLVIII, Part I, p. 351.
  18. "Olathe cracks top 25 in fastest-growing U.S. cities". Kansas City Star. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  19. Roberts, Sam (June 28, 2007). "Biggest Urban Growth Is in South and West". The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2010.
  20. "Best places to live 2008". CNN. Retrieved May 20, 2010.
  21. http://heavy.com/news/2017/02/adam-purinton-olathe-shooter-shooting-suspect-veteran-muslim-islam-slur-who-is-dead-death-applebees-update-austins-bar-kansas/
  22. "Black Bob Park". Olathe Parks and Recreation, Olathe Kansas. Archived from the original on 2008-03-19. Retrieved 2013-02-17.
  23. United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved November 28, 2014.
  24. "Garmin | About Us". www8.garmin.com. 2011 [last update]. Retrieved March 7, 2011. Check date values in: |year= (help)
  25. "2015 City of Olathe, Kansas Comprehensive Annual Financial Report For the Year Ended December 31, 2015" (PDF). Retrieved February 27, 2017.

Other websites[change | change source]