Oscar (fish)

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Oscar
Astronotus ocellatus.jpg
Scientific classification
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A. ocellatus
Binomial name
Astronotus ocellatus
Agassiz, 1831

Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus) is a species of fish from the cichlid family. Oscars have many common names. Some of these names are oscar, tiger oscar, velvet cichlid, and marble cichlid. The scientific name for the oscar species is A. ocellatus. Oscars can grow up to 16 inches (41 cm) long and weigh over 3 pounds (1.4 kg). The Oscar fish is a smart species of fish. Oscars are popular as aquarium fish. Oscars are also very aggressive.

Description[change | change source]

The Oscar is a large predatory fish at grows up two 18”. Their bodies are colorful and dark colors mixed with bright colors. Different variations include some with albinism “albino oscar” and others with darker variations “tiger oscar”.

Behavior[change | change source]

The Oscar is an aggressive predator from the Amazon River. Oscars create territories and attack other fish that come into their territory. Captive bred oscars can do well in certain community tanks with only fish from their region. For this to work you need to get you oscar from a breeder as small as possible, so they know the other possible tank mates are not a threat/food.

Feeding[change | change source]

Captive oscars may be fed prepared fish food designed for large carnivorous fish. They can also eat crayfish, worms, and insects. Insects include, crickets, mealworms, grasshoppers, praying mantis and even hornworms. At about 6 months age, oscars can be fed live feeder fish, such as minnows, small gold fish and other feeder fish that can fit easily in their mouths. Captive bred oscars do best when fed natural frozen “carnivorous” fish food, along with live insects and crickets to keep a varied diet. These include, frozen bloodworms, frozen mysis shrimp, frozen beef heart, and frozen mixed fish cubes, as well as live feeders stated above.