Otto Rehhagel

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Otto Rehhagel
Otto Rehhagel 01.jpg
Rehhagel in 2010
Personal information
Full name Otto Rehhagel
Date of birth (1938-08-09) 9 August 1938 (age 84)
Place of birth Essen, Germany
Height 1.77 m (5 ft 10 in)
Position(s) Defender
Youth career
1948–1957 TuS Helene Altenessen
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1957–1960 TuS Helene Altenessen
1960–1963 Rot-Weiss Essen 90 (3)
1963–1965 Hertha BSC 53 (6)
1965–1972 1. FC Kaiserslautern 148 (17)
National team
1960 West Germany Amateur 2 (0)
Teams managed
1972 FV Rockenhausen
1972–1973 1. FC Saarbrücken
1973–1974 Kickers Offenbach (Assistant coach)
1974–1975 Kickers Offenbach
1976 Werder Bremen
1976–1978 Borussia Dortmund
1978–1979 Arminia Bielefeld
1979–1980 Fortuna Düsseldorf
1981–1995 Werder Bremen
1995–1996 Bayern Munich
1996–2000 1. FC Kaiserslautern
2001–2010 Greece
2012 Hertha BSC
Honours
Men's football
Representing  Greece (as manager)
UEFA European Championship
Winner 2004
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Otto Rehhagel (German: [ˈɔtoː ˈʁeːhaːɡl̩]; born 9 August 1938) is a German former football coach and player.

Rehhagel is one of two people to have played in more than 1,000 Bundesliga matches as a player and coach (the other being Jupp Heynckes). In the Bundesliga, he holds the records for most wins (387), most draws (205) and most losses (228), with his team scoring more goals (1,473) and conceding goals (1,142) than any other team. From 1981 to 1995 he worked as manager for Werder Bremen, winning the Bundesliga twice with them and the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup in 1992. After a rather unfortunate intermezzo at Bayern Munich, he sensationally won the Bundesliga with promoted team 1. FC Kaiserslautern.

Playing career[change | change source]

Born in Altenessen, Rehhagel began his career with local club TuS Helene Altenessen in 1948, then transferred to Rot-Weiss Essen (1960–63) and then played the Bundesliga at Hertha BSC (1963–65) until 1972 for Kaiserslautern. He played 201 games in the Bundesliga.

Career statistics[change | change source]

As of 15 May 2012
Team From To Record
G W D L Win % Ref.
1. FC Saarbrücken 1 July 1972 30 June 1973 30 7 10 13 023.33
Kickers Offenbach 2 April 1974 9 December 1975 60 23 10 27 038.33
Werder Bremen 29 February 1976[1] 30 June 1976[1] 13 4 5 4 030.77 [1]
Borussia Dortmund 1 July 1976[2] 30 April 1978[2] 74 29 16 29 039.19 [2]
Arminia Bielefeld 10 October 1978 11 October 1979 37 15 9 13 040.54
Fortuna Düsseldorf 12 October 1979 5 December 1980 53 26 9 18 049.06
Werder Bremen 2 April 1981[1] 30 June 1995[1] 609 322 156 131 052.87 [1]
Bayern Munich 1 July 1995[3] 27 April 1996[3] 42 27 5 10 064.29 [3]
1. FC Kaiserslautern 20 July 1996 1 October 2000 174 87 38 49 050.00
Greece 9 August 2001 30 June 2010 106 52 22 32 049.06
Hertha BSC 19 February 2012 30 June 2012 14 3 3 8 021.43
Total 1,225 606 278 341 049.47

Honours[change | change source]

Managerial honours[change | change source]

Fortuna Düsseldorf
Werder Bremen
1. FC Kaiserslautern
Greece
Individual

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 "Werder Bremen" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 16 January 2014.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 "Borussia Dortmund" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 16 January 2014.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "Bayern München" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 16 January 2014.
  4. Jamie Rainbow (4 July 2013). "The Greatest Manager of all time". World Soccer.
  5. Jamie Rainbow (2 July 2013). "The Greatest XI: how the panel voted". World Soccer. Archived from the original on 1 January 2015. Retrieved 6 January 2020.
  6. "Top 50 des coaches de l'historie". France Football. 19 March 2019. Retrieved 19 March 2019.
  7. "The 50 best coaches in history, according to 'France Football'". BeSoccer. 29 March 2019. Retrieved 6 December 2019.

Other websites[change | change source]