Pasty

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A Cornish pasty

The pasty is a kind of pastry filled with meat or vegetables and baked, a bit like a pie. They are linked with Cornwall where they were first made. Most pasties are still made in Cornwall.

Description[change | change source]

Pastry dough is rolled out and cut in a circle. The raw filling is placed on half the circle, then the pastry is folded in half over the filling to cover it. The edges are then sealed by crimping (firmly pressed together), and baked. The baking time for the filling and the pastry is the same.

The pasty is made as a single-serving portion, for one person's meal. It's made to be held in the hand and does not require any cutlery. It may be eaten hot, warm, or at room temperature.

Uses[change | change source]

The pasty is portable and convenient to eat. It can be easily be taken to the workplace and kept until a mealtime break. No refrigeration is required if eaten the same day. The sealed, baked dough keeps the filling warm for hours after baking. A pasty could also be reheated by placing on or near a heat source - even by holding over a candle where no oven is available.