Petro Mohyla

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Peter Mogila
Mohyla Petro.jpg
TitleMetropolitan of Kyiv and Halych and All Rus',
Exarch of Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople
Personal
Born(1596-12-21)December 21, 1596
DiedJanuary 1, 1647(1647-01-01) (aged 50)
Resting placeDormition Church (Kyiv Cave Monastery)
ReligionChristianity
Senior posting
Period in office1633-1646
Consecration7 May 1633 in Dormition Church, Lviv
PredecessorIsaia Kopynsky
SuccessorSylvester Kosiv
Previous postArchimandrite of the Kyiv Pechersk Lavra

Petro Mohyla or Petro Mogila (Ukrainian: Петро Могила; 21 (31) December 1596,[1] - 1 (11) January 1647[1]) was a Ukrainian political, church and educational figure.[2] He was a Metropolitan of Kyiv, Halych, and All Rus' (1633-1647). He was a representative of the Moldavian noble family Mohyla (in Romanian Movilă). He was born in Suceava, Romania. He is a son of the Moldavian pricne Simion Mohyla (Movilă).

He took part in the political life of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. He participated in the Khotyn War (1620-1621). He carried out a radical reform of the Orthodox Church and education in Ukraine according to Catholic and Greek Catholic models. Is is the founder of Ukrainian theology.[3] He is the author of "Trebnik" (1646),[4] co-author of the catechism "Orthodox Confession of Faith" (1640). He died in Kyiv in 1647 and was buried in Kyiv-Pechersk Lavra. He is a local saint as he was recognized as saint by the Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Moscow Patriarchate) and the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Kyiv Patriarchate in 1996.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Освітня реформа. Св. Петро Могила". web.archive.org. 2018-09-18. Retrieved 2021-01-22.
  2. Kollmann, Nancy Shields (2016-12-22). The Russian Empire 1450-1801. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-108269-6.
  3. "Creeds of Christendom, with a History and Critical notes. Volume I. The History of Creeds. - Christian Classics Ethereal Library". web.archive.org. 2016-09-11. Retrieved 2021-01-22.
  4. "Енциклопедія історії України". web.archive.org. 2016-07-21. Retrieved 2021-01-22.