Puss in Boots (Shrek)

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Puss in Boots is a main character in the Shrek franchise, also being portrayed as the title character and protagonist of the movie Puss in Boots (2011). He made his first appearance in the movie Shrek 2 (2004), soon becoming Shrek's partner and helper (alongside Donkey). In the movie Shrek the Third (2007), Puss helps Shrek find the heir to the throne of the Far Far Away Kingdom. The movie Shrek Forever After (2010) is primarily set in an alternate universe, where Puss is Princess Fiona's pet and has gained weight after his retirement. In the spin-off and prequel Puss in Boots, his origins are described. Puss also appears in the Netflix television series centered on him, The Adventures of Puss in Boots (2015–2018).

Puss was inspired by the title character of the fairy tale "Puss in Boots". His design, created by Tom Hester, was based on real cats. Several characters were used as inspirations for Puss's characterization, such as Zorro and Indiana Jones. The idea of Puss as the protagonist of a film was explored after his debut appearance. Antonio Banderas voices Puss in the English, Spanish, and Italian dubs of the Shrek franchise. While he initially tried a high-pitched voice for the character, he and the Shrek 2 filmmakers decided on a tone that was deeper than his normal voice. Banderas said that voicing Puss was an important part of his career. Eric Bauza provides Puss's voice in The Adventures of Puss in Boots.

The character is well liked, with critics praising his depiction and considering him a source of comic relief. Reviewers have regarded Puss as a popular Shrek character. Banderas's voice acting has also been praised. Merchandise inspired by the character has been produced.

Development[change | change source]

Concept and creation[change | change source]

Puss in Boots is inspired by the title character of the fairy tale with the same name.[1]

Voice[change | change source]

A smiling, alert Antonio Banderas
Antonio Banderas (pictured above) voiced Puss in Boots in the English, Spanish, and Italian dubs of the Shrek franchise.[2][3][4]

Antonio Banderas voiced Puss in the Shrek franchise.[2][3][5] Banderas said that his initial motivation to voice Puss was that he enjoyed the movie Shrek (2001).[6] According to the actor, he was chosen for the role of Puss because of his Spanish accent.[7]

Reception[change | change source]

Critical response[change | change source]

Critical reception of Puss has been well liked, with reviewers praising him in the movies and describing him as "cute",[8][9][10][11] "suave",[12][13][14][15] "lovable",[16][17][18] "charismatic",[13][19] "feisty",[20][21] "engaging",[22] "legendary",[23] "an instant charmer",[24] "a natural-born star",[25] "a notorious adventurer",[2] the "suavest of swashbuckling cats",[26] and "the world's greatest feline swordfighter".[27] He was also regarded as "smooth-talking",[28][29] "heroic",[30] "honorable",[31] self-confident,[32] "passionate",[33] loyal,[32] with "humble" origins.[34] Collider's Christina Radish described Puss as "charming and unforgettable", adding that he "was a cat destined for great things".[35] Radish said that Puss getting his own movie was no surprise, commenting that the character has a "tremendous heart",[35] and is a "much-loved fighter".[13] Fantasy Magazine's Andrew Penn Romine called Puss "equal parts rogue and hero",[36] but Stephen Holden of The New York Times described the character as "this vain, spoiled, swashbuckler".[37] According to Holden, Puss is not "as clear-cut a personality [in Puss in Boots] as he was" in the Shrek movies.[37] IndieLondon's Rob Carnevale called him a "cheeky feline swashbuckler" and Puss in Boots's "enigmatic central character".[19] Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter described Puss as a "dashing little kitty centerstage", "ever-bold",[38] and "a self-deprecating, sometimes bumbling but ultimately dashing swordsman".[38] McCarthy enjoyed Puss's "vigorous physicality" in Puss in Boots.[38] Neil Genzlinger of The New York Times called Puss "endearing", "dashing and fearless but also a tad reckless".[20] Chrissy Iley of The Telegraph described him as "the world's most seductive animated cat".[39] IGN's Andy Patrizio enjoyed Puss in Shrek 2,[40] and Scott Collura of the same website said that Puss "remains dignified and cool" in Shrek Forever After despite his weight gain.[41] The character has been regarded as a source of comic relief.[42][15][29][43]

References[change | change source]

  1. Levin, Rob (October 28, 2011). "Director Chris Miller Ventures Into 'Surreal' World of Puss in Boots". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on July 3, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Patten, Fred (February 14, 2012). "Book Review: 'The Art of Puss In Boots'". Animation World Network. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Meslow, Scott (October 28, 2011). "How Celebrities Took Over Cartoon Voice Acting". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on July 31, 2018. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  4. "Antonio Banderas Interview". RTÉ.ie. June 17, 2010. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  5. "Antonio Banderas Reveals How His Puss in Boots Character Follows Him Everywhere". People. April 23, 2018. Archived from the original on July 31, 2018. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  6. Lebowitz, Steven (October 31, 2011). "'Puss in Boots' interview with Antonio Banderas and Salma Hayek". AXS. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  7. Itzkoff, Dave (May 14, 2010). "He's Big, He's Green, and He's Gone". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  8. Savlov, Marc (May 21, 2004). "Shrek 2". The Austin Chronicle. Archived from the original on June 10, 2019. Retrieved June 7, 2019.
  9. Lumenick, Lou (May 18, 2004). "Ogre Joyed – 'Shrek 2' Is a Monster of a Good Tale". New York Post. Archived from the original on June 6, 2019. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  10. Bettinger, Brendan (June 5, 2010). "First Synopses for Puss in Boots and Kung Fu Panda: The Kaboom of Doom". Collider. Archived from the original on November 12, 2019. Retrieved November 12, 2019.
  11. Ward, Kate (June 21, 2010). "'Puss In Boots' spin-off details revealed. Why this could be the cat's meow". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on November 12, 2019. Retrieved November 12, 2019.
  12. "Chris Miller (Puss in Boots) Interview 2011". Tribute. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Radish, Christina (February 1, 2015). "Eric Bauza Talks The Adventures of Puss in Boots". Collider. Archived from the original on July 30, 2018. Retrieved July 30, 2018.
  14. Jones, Alan. "Puss in Boots". Radio Times. Archived from the original on September 21, 2018. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  15. 15.0 15.1 Scheck, Frank (October 14, 2010). "Shrek Forever After – Film Review". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on July 6, 2018. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  16. "Puss in Boots: The Three Diablos". Radio Times. Archived from the original on July 6, 2018. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  17. Otto, Jeff (May 18, 2004). "Shrek 2". IGN. Archived from the original on July 6, 2018. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  18. Crane, Kelly (November 27, 2011). "Antonio Banderas: The cat that got the cream". Gulf News. Archived from the original on July 31, 2018. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  19. 19.0 19.1 Carnevale, Rob. "Puss in Boots – Review". IndieLondon. Archived from the original on July 4, 2018. Retrieved July 4, 2018.
  20. 20.0 20.1 Genzlinger, Neil (January 15, 2015). "5 More Lives, and Counting". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 17, 2015. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  21. Miller, Ross (November 5, 2009). "Zach Galifianakis To Voice Humpty Dumpty In 'Puss In Boots'". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on August 17, 2019. Retrieved August 17, 2019.
  22. Rogers, Katharine M. (2006). Cat. Reaktion Books. pp. 169–170, 174–175. ISBN 978-1-86189-292-8.
  23. Spangler, Todd (March 13, 2014). "Netflix to Add Three Original Series from DreamWorks Animation, Sets Debut for New 'Turbo FAST' Episodes". Variety. Archived from the original on September 21, 2018. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  24. Zahed, Ramin (October 7, 2011). "A Swashbuckling Cat for All Seasons". Animation Magazine. Archived from the original on September 7, 2018. Retrieved September 7, 2018.
  25. Cohn, Angel. "Shrek 2". TV Guide. Archived from the original on June 10, 2019. Retrieved June 7, 2019.
  26. King, Susan (September 4, 2011). "Animation: Chris Miller, 'Puss in Boots'". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on June 10, 2019. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  27. Beck, Jerry (December 11, 2015). "Netflix/Dreamworks Preview "Adventures of Puss in Boots" Season 2". IndieWire. Archived from the original on July 30, 2018. Retrieved July 30, 2018.
  28. McNary, Dave (February 26, 2019). "'Puss in Boots' Sequel Lands 'Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse' Director". Variety. Archived from the original on April 16, 2019. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  29. 29.0 29.1 Hassenger, Jesse (October 27, 2011). "'Puss in Boots': That's One Fine Looking Cat". PopMatters. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  30. Knight, Claire (September 20, 2019). "The best movies to stream for the kids these school holidays". Nine.com.au. Archived from the original on September 25, 2019. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  31. Scott, A. O. (May 18, 2004). "Film Review; The New Son-in-Law's an Ogre, And Hollywood Is the Target". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 6, 2019. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  32. 32.0 32.1 "The 50 Best Animated Movie Characters". Empire. November 8, 2010. Archived from the original on July 4, 2018. Retrieved July 4, 2018.
  33. Barnard, Linda (October 27, 2011). "Puss in Boots: Good kitty". Toronto Star. Archived from the original on September 5, 2018. Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  34. Miraudo, Simon (December 7, 2011). "Interview – Chris Miller, Puss in Boots". Quickflix. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  35. 35.0 35.1 Radish, Christina (October 27, 2011). "Director Chris Miller Talks Puss in Boots and Collaborating With Guillermo del Toro". Collider. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  36. Romine, Andrew Penn. "Feature Interview: Puss in Boots Director Chris Miller". Fantasy Magazine. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  37. 37.0 37.1 Holden, Stephen (October 27, 2011). "A Fairy Tale Mix With 9 Lives and Dozens of Egg Jokes". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  38. 38.0 38.1 38.2 McCarthy, Todd (October 23, 2011). "Puss in Boots: Film Review". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  39. Iley, Chrissy (December 4, 2011). "Antonio Banderas on Puss in Boots". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  40. Patrizio, Andy (November 5, 2004). "Shrek 2". IGN. Archived from the original on July 6, 2018. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  41. Collura, Scott (May 20, 2010). "Shrek Forever After Review". IGN. Archived from the original on July 6, 2018. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  42. "Film trailer: Banderas in 'Shrek' spin-off 'Puss in Boots'". The Independent. March 7, 2011. Archived from the original on August 28, 2018. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  43. Mottram, James (November 24, 2011). "Cat in Boots in 3D". The National. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved June 30, 2018.