Right to education

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The right to education is one of the human rights, but it is not used by everyone. The right should make everyone equal and help to end discrimination. It is thought that all children should go to school for primary education from the age of six years, to the age of ten years. During this time, children usually learn reading and writing skills in their mother tongue (first language), as well as some easy mathematics, social studies and science. Furthermore, all children should have access to secondary education, and higher education. However, many children around the world cannot or do not go to secondary education or higher education.

The right to education is written in Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 14 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.[1][2] The right to education has also been re-stated in the 1960 UNESCO Convention against Discrimination in Education, 1st Protocol of ECHR and the 1981 Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.[3]

It is also listed in the European Convention on Human Rights, Protocol 1, Article 2. Some national constitutions name this right, for example the Belgian constitution (former article 17, now article 24) or the Dutch constitution (article 23).[4]

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