River Trent

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Coordinates: 53°42′03″N 00°41′28″W / 53.70083°N 0.69111°W / 53.70083; -0.69111
Trent
River
RiverTrentNottingham.jpg
Trent Bridge, with Nottingham in the background
Country United Kingdom
Country within the UK England
Counties Staffordshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, Lincolnshire, Yorkshire
Tributaries
 - left Dove, Derwent, Erewash
 - right Mease, Tame, Soar, Devon
Cities Stoke-on-Trent, Lichfield, Derby, Nottingham, Newark-on-Trent
Source
 - location Knypersley, near Biddulph in Staffordshire, England
 - elevation 180 m (591 ft)
Mouth Humber Estuary
 - location Trent Falls, England
 - elevation m (0 ft)
 - coordinates 53°42′03″N 00°41′28″W / 53.70083°N 0.69111°W / 53.70083; -0.69111
Length 298 km (185 mi)
Discharge for Colwick, Nottingham
 - average 85 /s (3,002 cu ft/s)
 - max 1,018.35 /s (35,963 cu ft/s) 1230hrs on 8 November 2000 - highest discharge since 1 September 1958
The drainage basin of the River Trent -->
The drainage basin of the River Trent -->

The River Trent is one of the major rivers of England. It starts in Staffordshire. It flows through the centre of England until it joins the River Ouse to form the River Humber (estuary) which empties into the North Sea.

The name "Trent" comes from a Celtic word possibly meaning "strongly flooding". More specifically, the name may be a contraction of two Celtic words, tros ("over") and hynt ("way").[1]

It is unusual amongst English rivers in that it flows north (for the second half of its route), and is also unusual in exhibiting a tidal bore, the "Aegir". The area drained by the river includes most of the northern Midlands.

Navigation today[change | edit source]

The river is legally navigable for some 117 miles (188 km) below Burton upon Trent. However for practical purposes, navigation above the southern terminus of the Trent and Mersey Canal (at Shardlow) is conducted on the canal, rather than on the river itself.

Trent Aegir[change | edit source]

At certain times of the year, the lower tidal reaches of the Trent experience a tidal bore which can be up to five feet (1.5m) high.


References[change | edit source]

Other websites[change | edit source]