Run (cricket)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
How runs are scored and teams win a match

There are many versions of cricket. In general, cricket uses runs for scoring. In most cases, the team with the most runs wins the game. One run (known as a "single") is scored when a batsman (known as the "striker") has hit the ball and directs it away from the fielders. Both the striker and the non-stiker then run the length of the pitch, 22 yards (20 m). They will cross each other. Each time the batsmen runs back and forth is counted as another run. To complete a run, both batsmen must make their ground, with some part of their person or bat touching the ground behind the crease (line) at the other end of the pitch. If the wicket is knocked off by a fielder before the batsman crosses the crease, the batman is out of the game.[1]

The batsman is given four runs if the ball rolls along the ground and hits the boundary. They are given six runs if the ball crosses the boundary while in the air, similar to a home run in baseball.

When it takes longer to recover the ball, the batsmen may run several times and score many runs.

The total score is obtained by adding up all runs.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Law 18 – Scoring runs". MCC. Retrieved 29 September 2017.