Samudaya sacca

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Samudaya sacca is the second of the four noble truths in Buddhism. It is about the origins of dukkha (suffering).

Etymology[change | change source]

Samudaya has many meanings, but it usually means "origin" or "source." Sacca means "truth" or "reality." So because of this, Samudaya sacca means "truth of the origin of suffering." [1]

Within the four noble truths[change | change source]

According to the Four Noble Truths, the origin (Samudaya) of suffering (sacca) is from cravings taught by ignorance. The craving is shown in three ways:

  • Craving for objects that give pleasurable feelings, or craving for sensory pleasures.
  • Craving to dominate others.
  • Craving to be away from the world because of painful feelings.

References[change | change source]

  1. http://spokensanskrit.de/index.php?script=HK&beginning=0+&tinput=+samudaya&trans=Translate&direction=AU