Sasebo slashing

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The "Sasebo slashing" (Japanese: 佐世保小6女児同級生殺害事件, Hepburn: Sasebo shōroku joji dōkyūsei satsugai jiken)[1] was the murder of a 12-year-old Japanese schoolgirl, Satomi Mitarai (御手洗 怜美, Mitarai Satomi), by an 11-year-old female classmate known as "Girl A".[2]

The murder happened on June 1, 2004, at an elementary school in the city of Sasebo in Nagasaki Prefecture. The murderer slit Mitarai's throat and arms with a box cutter.[3]

The slashing became an Internet memes and led to people talk about lowering the age of criminal responsibility in Japan. The killer's real name has not been released to the press.[4][5]

The murderer was nicknamed "Nevada-tan" because a class photograph showed a girl believed to be her wearing a University of Nevada, Reno sweatshirt.[6]

However, the girl's real name was accidentally revealed on a Fuji TV broadcast and members of Japanese internet community 2channel further publicized her identity on June 18, 2004.[7][8]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Japanese schoolgirl kills classmate". The Sydney Morning Herald. June 2, 2004. Retrieved June 6, 2008.
  2. Yamaguchi, Mari (June 2, 2004). "Japanese girl accused of killing classmate". The Independent. London. Archived from the original on March 5, 2019. Retrieved June 24, 2008.
  3. "Girl says internet spat prompted slaying". China Daily. June 4, 2004. Retrieved June 23, 2008.
  4. "Japanese girl stabbed to death in school". China Daily. June 2, 2004. Retrieved June 6, 2008.
  5. ネットに加害女児の顔、名前 長崎地方法務局が削除要請. Nagasaki Shimbun (in Japanese). June 3, 2004. Archived from the original on June 5, 2004. Retrieved June 23, 2008. Internet Archive copy.
  6. "Nevada-tan". Know Your Meme. Retrieved April 19, 2018.
  7. Satō, Haruto (2005). Hanzai Kogal. 2005. pp. 11, 46, 29.CS1 maint: location (link)
  8. ネットに加害女児の顔、名前 長崎地方法務局が削除要請. Nagasaki Shimbun (in Japanese). June 3, 2004. Archived from the original on June 5, 2004. Retrieved June 23, 2008. Internet Archive copy.