Shōhei

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For the Japanese era from 931 through 938, see Jōhei.

Shōhei (正平) was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. year name) of the Southern Court during the Nanboku-chō period after Kōkoku and before Kentoku. This period started in December 1346 and ended in July 1370.[1]

The monarchs during this time were Emperor Go-Murakami (後村上天皇, Go-Murakami-tennō)[2] and Emperor Chōkei (長慶天皇, Chōkei-tennō).[3] The Northern Court pretenders in Kyoto were Emperor Kōmyō (光明天皇, Kōmyō-tennō),[4] Emperor Sukō (崇光天皇, Sukō-tennō)[5] and Emperor Go-Kōgon (後光厳天皇, Go-Kōgon-tennō).[6]

Events of the Shōhei era[change | change source]

  • 2 December 1348 ((Shōhei 3, 11th day of the 11th month): Former-Emperor Hanazono died.[7]
  • 1349 (Shōhei 4): Go-Murakami fled to A'no.[8]
  • 1350 (Kannō 5): Yoshinori guarded Kyoto.[9]
  • 13501352 (Shōhei 5–7): Armed conflict, variously known as the Kannō disturbance or Kannō incident (観応擾乱, Kannō Jōran) or Kannō no Juran.[10]
  • 1352 (Shōhei 7): Emperor Go-Murakami captured former-emperors Kōgon, Kōmyō and Sukō; and they were permitted to return to Kyoto in 1357 (Shōhei 12).[11]
  • 1354 (Shōhei 9): Kitabatake Chikafusa dies.[8]
  • 1358 (Shōhei 13): Death of Ashikaga Takauji;[12] Ashikaga Yoshiakira was appointed as the new shogun.[8]
  • 1361 (Shōhei 16): Snowfall was unusually heavy; and there was also a disastrous fire in Kyoto as well as a violent earthquake.[13]
  • 1368 (Shōhei 23): Ashikaga Yoshimitsu became the third shogun of the Ashikaga shogunate.[14]
  • 29 March 1368 (Shōhei 23, 11th day of the 3rd month): Go-Murakami died;[15] and his oldest son received the succession.[8]

Northern Court nengō[change | change source]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 880. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  2. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 257. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  3. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  4. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 555. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  5. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 991. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  6. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 255. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  7. 天皇の詩歌と消息 -宸翰にみる書式-: Shinkan Ni Miru Shoshiki. 立命館大学アート・リサーチセンター. 2006. p. 74.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 Ackroyd, Joyce. (1982) Lessons from History: the Tokushi Yoron, p.329.
  9. Klaproth, Julius von (1834). Nipon o dai itsi ran: ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Oriental Translation Fund. p. 299.
  10. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric (2002). Japan Encyclopedia. Harvard University Press. p. 474. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5.
  11. Klaproth, Julius von (1834). Nipon o dai itsi ran: ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Oriental Translation Fund. p. 303.
  12. Klaproth, Julius von (1834). Nipon o dai itsi ran: ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Oriental Translation Fund. p. 304.
  13. Klaproth, Julius von (1834). Nipon o dai itsi ran: ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Oriental Translation Fund. p. 305.
  14. Klaproth, Julius von (1834). Nipon o dai itsi ran: ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Oriental Translation Fund. p. 308.
  15. Richard Arthur Brabazon Ponsonby-Fane (1959). The Imperial House of Japan. Ponsonby Memorial Society. p. 138.

Other websites[change | change source]


Shōhei 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th
1346 1347 1348 1349 1350 1351 1352 1353 1354 1355 1356 1357 1358 1359 1360 1361 1362 1363 1364 1365
Shōhei 11st 12nd 13rd 14th 15th
1366 1367 1368 1369 1370
Preceded by:
Kōkoku
Era or nengō:
Shōhei
Succeeded by:
Kentoku