Shintaro Abe

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Shintaro Abe
安倍 晋太郎
Shintarō Abe cropped.jpg
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
27 November 1982 – 22 July 1986
Prime MinisterYasuhiro Nakasone
Preceded byYoshio Sakurauchi
Succeeded byTadashi Kuranari
Minister of International Trade and Industry
In office
30 November 1981 – 27 November 1982
Prime MinisterZenkō Suzuki
Preceded byRokusuke Tanaka
Succeeded bySadanori Yamanaka
Chief Cabinet Secretary
In office
28 November 1977 – 7 December 1978
Prime MinisterTakeo Fukuda
Preceded bySunao Sonoda
Succeeded byRokusuke Tanaka
Minister of Agriculture and Forestry
In office
9 December 1974 – 15 September 1976
Prime MinisterTakeo Miki
Preceded byTadao Kuraishi
Succeeded byBuichi Ōishi
Personal details
Born(1924-04-29)29 April 1924
Tokyo City, Tokyo Prefecture
Empire of Japan
Died15 May 1991(1991-05-15) (aged 67)
Tokyo, Japan
Political partyLiberal Democratic Party
Spouse(s)Yoko
ChildrenHironobu Abe
Shinzō Abe
Nobuo Kishi (given for adoption)
ParentsKan Abe
Shizuko Abe
RelativesNobusuke Kishi (father-in-law)
Alma materUniversity of Tokyo

Shintaro Abe (安倍 晋太郎, Abe Shintarō, 29 April 1924 – 15 May 1991)[1] was a Japanese politician. He was a leading member of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP). He was Foreign Minister from 1982 to 1986.[2] He was the father of former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and the current Japanese Minister of Defense Nobuo Kishi, and the son-in-law of former Prime Minister Nobusuke Kishi.

Abe was hospitalized in January 1991.[3] He died of heart failure at a Tokyo hospital on May 15, 1991 at aged 67.[4]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Abe, Shintaro". Who Was Who in America, with World Notables, v. 10: 1989-1993. New Providence, NJ: Marquis Who's Who. 1993. p. 1. ISBN 0837902207.
  2. Yates, Ronald E. (May 16, 1991). "Shintaro Abe, 67". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 1, 2013.
  3. "Shintaro Abe; Ex-Japanese Foreign Minister". Los Angeles Times. Tokyo. May 16, 1991. Retrieved January 1, 2013.
  4. "Shintaro Abe, Japanese Political Leader". The Seattle Times. May 15, 1991. Retrieved January 1, 2013.