Stealthing

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

When a man removes a condom during sexual intercourse, but his partner has not agreed, this is called stealthing, or non-consensual condom removal.[1][2] His partner has only agreed to sex with a condom. The risks are the same as having sex without a condom, there may be unwanted pregnancies, as well as the problem of sexually transmitted infections.[3] In many countries, this behaviour is viewed as sexual assault or rape, and punished accordingly.[4] As of 2020, stealthing is punishable as a form of sexual violence in some countries, such as Germany and the United Kingdom.[3]

Damaging a condom on purpose, before or during its use is sometiemes also called stealthing; this is independent on who damaged the condom. [5]

Impact and risks[change | change source]

Removing or damaging a condom during sex increases the risks of unintended pregnancy and the transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs).[2][5][6] Victims may feel betrayal and many victims see it as a "grave violation of dignity and autonomy". Many may also experience emotional and psychological distress, especially those who have experienced sexual violence in the past.[5]

References[change | change source]

  1. Hatch, Jenavieve (21 April 2017). "Inside The Online Community Of Men Who Preach Removing Condoms Without Consent". Huffington Post. Retrieved 23 April 2017.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Brodsky, Alexandra (2017). "'Rape-Adjacent': Imagining Legal Responses to Nonconsensual Condom Removal". Columbia Journal of Gender and Law. 32 (2). SSRN 2954726.Brodsky, Alexandra (2017). "'Rape-Adjacent': Imagining Legal Responses to Nonconsensual Condom Removal". Columbia Journal of Gender and Law. 32 (2). SSRN 2954726.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Alexandra Stanic & Rose Donohoe (10 February 2020). "'He Secretly Took the Condom Off' – People Talk About the Times They Were 'Stealthed'". Vice. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  4. Melissa Cunningham (3 June 2019). "One in three women victim to 'stealth' condom removal". The Age. Retrieved 18 February 2021.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Nedelman, Michael (27 April 2017). "Some call it 'stealthing,' others call it sexual assault". CNN.
  6. Kelly, Laura (30 April 2017). "Law paper condemns 'stealthing' assailants removing condoms during intercourse without consent". The Washington Times.