Steven Joyce

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Steven Joyce
Steven Joyce in Estonia, March 2016.jpg
Joyce in 2016
41st Minister of Finance
In office
20 December 2016 – 20 October 2017
Prime MinisterBill English
Preceded byBill English
Succeeded byGrant Robertson
2nd Minister for Infrastructure
In office
20 December 2016 – 26 October 2017
Prime MinisterBill English
Preceded byPosition created (last held by Bill English)
Succeeded byShane Jones
5th Minister for Economic Development
In office
14 December 2011 – 20 December 2016
Prime MinisterJohn Key
Bill English
Preceded byGerry Brownlee
Succeeded bySimon Bridges
24th Minister for Science and Innovation
In office
14 December 2011 – 20 December 2016
Prime MinisterJohn Key
Bill English
Preceded byWayne Mapp
Succeeded byPaul Goldsmith
Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment
In office
27 January 2010 – 20 December 2016
Prime MinisterJohn Key
Bill English
Preceded byAnne Tolley
Succeeded byPaul Goldsmith
24th Minister of Transport
In office
19 November 2008 – 14 December 2011
Prime MinisterJohn Key
Preceded byAnnette King
Succeeded byGerry Brownlee
Minister for Communications and Information Technology
In office
19 November 2008 – 14 December 2011
Prime MinisterJohn Key
Preceded byDavid Cunliffe
Succeeded byAmy Adams
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for National party list
In office
8 November 2008 – 2 April 2018
Succeeded byNicola Willis
Personal details
Born (1963-04-07) 7 April 1963 (age 59)
New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand[1]
NationalityNew Zealand
Political partyNational Party
Spouse(s)Suzanne Joyce
Children2
Alma materMassey University
OccupationBroadcasting entrepreneur

Steven Leonard Joyce (born 7 April 1963) is a New Zealand former politician. He became a member of New Zealand House of Representatives in 2008 as a member of the New Zealand National Party.

As a broadcasting entrepreneur with RadioWorks, he was a millionaire before he entered politics.[2]

On 6 March 2018, he announced his resignation from politics.[3]

References[change | change source]

  1. Young, Audrey (20 March 2010). "Steven Joyce becomes Govt's 'everywhere man'". New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 18 December 2016.
  2. Gower, Patrick (3 October 2009). "Key lieutenant makes most of a fast start". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 11 March 2010.
  3. Bracewell-Worrall, Anna; Lynch, Jenna; Ewing, Isobel (6 March 2018). "Steven Joyce resigns from Parliament". Newshub. Retrieved 6 March 2018.