Talk:Goethe's Faust

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Full citation[change source]

I just tried to find a translation, which really tries to capture the meaning (I am german, so I have a pretty good idea what the original german text actually means). I found this translation, which according to Google Books is from Louis MacNeice. As far as I can tell it is very accurate and additionally really tries to capture the original meter:

Original German:

   Werd ich zum Augenblicke sagen:
   Verweile doch! du bist so schön!
   Dann magst du mich in Fesseln schlagen,
   Dann will ich gern zugrunde gehn!

Translation from Louis MacNeice:

   If ever I say to the passing moment:
   "Linger a while! Thou art so fair!
   Then you may cast me into fetters
   I will gladly perish then and there.

It would be nice if an english native speaker could somehow adapt this to more modern english, just to make sure everyone has an easy time catching (exact) meaning.

--178.27.134.184 (talk) 23:04, 5 April 2017 (UTC)

Just trying to adapt that to slightly more modern english myself, please correct:

   If I will ever say to the passing moment:
   "Stay a while! You are so beautiful!
   Then you may throw me into chains
   and I will gladly perish then and there."