Titanium dioxide

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Titanium dioxide
Names
IUPAC names
Titanium dioxide
Titanium(IV) oxide
Other names
Identifiers
  • 13463-67-7 checkY
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.033.327
E number E171 (colours)
KEGG
RTECS number
  • XR2775000
UNII
  • O=[Ti]=O
Properties
TiO
2
Molar mass 79.866 g/mol
Appearance White solid
Odor Odorless
Density
  • 4.23 g/cm3 (rutile)
  • 3.78 g/cm3 (anatase)
Melting point 1,843 °C (3,349 °F; 2,116 K)
Boiling point 2,972 °C (5,382 °F; 3,245 K)
Insoluble
Band gap 3.05 eV (rutile)[1]
+5.9·10−6 cm3/mol
  • 2.488 (anatase)
  • 2.583 (brookite)
  • 2.609 (rutile)
Thermochemistry
Std enthalpy of
formation
ΔfHo298
−945 kJ·mol−1[2]
Standard molar
entropy
So298
50 J·mol−1·K−1[2]
Hazards
EU classification Not listed
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

0
1
0
 
Flash point not flammable
U.S. Permissible
exposure limit (PEL)
TWA 15 mg/m3
Related compounds
Other cations Zirconium dioxide
Hafnium dioxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Titanium dioxide, also known as titanium(IV) oxide or titania /tˈtniə/, is the naturally occurring oxide of titanium, chemical formula TiO
2
. When used as a pigment, it is called titanium white, Pigment White 6 (PW6), or CI 77891. Generally, it is made from ilmenite, rutile, and anatase. It has a lot of uses, including paint, sunscreen, and food coloring. When used as a food coloring, it has E number E171. 9 million tonnes of it were made in the world in 2014.[3][4] It is used in around two-thirds of all pigments, and pigments based on the oxide have a total value of around $13.2 billion.[5]

References[change | change source]

  1. Nowotny, Janusz (2011). Oxide Semiconductors for Solar Energy Conversion: Titanium Dioxide. CRC Press. p. 156. ISBN 9781439848395.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Zumdahl, Steven S. (2009). Chemical Principles 6th Ed. Houghton Mifflin Company. p. A23. ISBN 978-0-618-94690-7.
  3. "Titanium" in 2014 Minerals Yearbook. USGS
  4. "Mineral Commodity Summaries, 2015" (PDF). U.S. Geological Survey. U.S. Geological Survey 2015.
  5. Schonbrun, Zach. "The Quest for the Next Billion-Dollar Color". Bloomberg.com. Retrieved 2018-04-24.