Type 56 assault rifle

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Type 56 assault rifle
Norinco type 56.jpg
The Type 56 assault rifle
TypeAssault rifle
Place of origin China
Service history
In service1956–now
Used bySee Users
WarsVietnam War and many other conflicts in Africa and Asia
Production history
Designed1956
Produced1956–now
VariantsType 56
Type 56-1
Type 56-2
Specifications
Mass8.5 lbs (3.9 kg) empty
10.5 lbs (4.8 kg) loaded
Length34.3 in (87 cm)
Barrel length16.4 in (41.6 cm)

Cartridge7.62×39mm
Caliber7.62 mm
ActionGas-operated, rotating bolt
Rate of fire600 rounds/minute
Muzzle velocity710~730 meters/second
Effective firing range400 meters
Feed system30 round magazine
SightsIron sights
A Chinese naval officer holds a Type 56 assault rifle.

The Type 56 is a Chinese assault rifle which is a copy of the Soviet AK-47 assault rifle. The Type 56 was first used by the North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong during the Vietnam War along with the Soviet AK-47 and AKM assault rifles. The Type 56 is used by many armies and battlefields in Africa, Middle East and Asia.

Variants[change | change source]

  • Type 56: Copy of the AK-47.
  • Type 56-1: Copy of the AKS-47.
  • Type 56-2: Same as the Type 56-1 but with a side folding stock instead of a under folding stock.

Users[change | change source]

  •  Afghanistan
  •  Albania[1]
  •  Armenia
  •  Bangladesh[2]
  •  Benin
  •  Bolivia
  •  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  •  Burkina Faso
  •  Burundi
  •  Cambodia[3][4]
  •  Central African Republic
  •  Chad
  •  China[5]
  •  Croatia
  •  Democratic Republic of the Congo
  •  Djibouti
  •  East Timor[6]
  •  Ecuador[7]
  •  Estonia[8]
  •  Ethiopia
  •  Finland[9]
  •  Gabon
  •  Guyana
  •  India
  •  Indonesia
  •  Iran
  •  Iraq
  •  Iraqi Kurdistan
  •  Ivory Coast
  •  Kenya
  •  Kosovo
  •  Laos[1]
  •  Lesotho
  •  Libya
  •  Madagascar
  •  Mali[1]
  •  Malta[1]
  •  Mexico
  •  Morocco
  •  Myanmar
  •    Nepal
  •  Nicaragua
  •  Niger
  •  Nigeria
  •  North Korea[1]
  •  Pakistan[1]
  •  Palestine
  •  Republic of the Congo
  •  Rwanda[10]
  •  Sierra Leone
  •  Somalia[11]
  •  South Sudan[12]
  •  Sri Lanka[1]
  •  Sudan[13]
  •  Syria[14]
  •  Tajikistan
  •  Tanzania
  •  Thailand
  •  The Gambia
  •  Togo
  •  Uganda
  •  United States
  •  Vietnam[5]
  •  Yemen[15]
  •  Zimbabwe

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Jones, Richard; Ness, Leland S. (2009). Jane's Infantry Weapons: 2009-2010. Janes Information Group. ISBN 978-0-7106-2869-5.
  2. "Bangladesh Military Forces - BDMilitary.com". Bangladesh Military Forces - BDMilitary.com. Retrieved 13 November 2014.
  3. Working Papers. Small Arms Survey (2011-12-01). Retrieved on 2012-05-20.
  4. Unwin, Charles C.; Vanessa U., Mike R., eds. (2002). 20th Century Military Uniforms (2nd ed.). Kent: Grange Books. ISBN 978-0-7607-3094-2.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Miller, David (2001). The Illustrated Directory of 20th Century Guns. Salamander Books. ISBN 978-1-84065-245-1.
  6. "ForumDefesa.com". Retrieved 13 November 2014.
  7. FF.AA. analizan usar los AK-47 de China para entrenamientos | El Comercio
  8. "56-2式冲锋枪(原版)详解 – 铁血网".
  9. "散布在世界各个角落里的中国轻兵器!(图片) – 铁血网".
  10. Rwanda
  11. Louis Charbonneau (2014-10-10). "Exclusive: Somalia army weapons sold on open market - U.N. monitors". Reuters. Retrieved 2017-06-22.
  12. "S Sudan rebels 'control key state'". BBC News. 2013-12-21.
  13. "MAZ". Military Industry Corporation. Retrieved 2009-02-08.
  14. Alwaght (2016-10-23). "Syrian Army Foils ISIS Attack on Military Airport". Alwaght News & Analysis. Retrieved 2017-08-16.
  15. Joseph Cox (2013-08-19). "Are American Drones Al Qaeda's Strongest Weapon in Yemen?". Vice. Retrieved 2017-06-22.