University of Mississippi

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The University of Mississippi
Motto Pro scientia et sapientia (Latin)
Motto in English On behalf of knowledge and wisdom
Established 1848
Type Public
Sea-grant
Space-grant
Endowment $470 million[1]
Chancellor Daniel W. Jones
Academic staff 729[2]
Students

16,786 in Oxford;

20,844 systemwide[3]
Location Oxford, Mississippi, United States
34°21′59″N 89°32′12″W / 34.3663°N 89.5368°W / 34.3663; -89.5368Coordinates: 34°21′59″N 89°32′12″W / 34.3663°N 89.5368°W / 34.3663; -89.5368
Campus Rural 2,000+ acres
Sports teams Rebels
Colors Harvard Crimson and Yale Blue           
(adopted in 1893)[4]
Website www.olemiss.edu
Ole Miss rebels Logo.svg

The University of Mississippi (also called Ole Miss) is a university in Oxford, Mississippi. The college was founded in 1848. Its sports teams, called the Rebels, play in the Southeastern Conference.

James Meredith walking to class accompanied by U.S. marshals

History[change | edit source]

In September 1962, James Meredith won a lawsuit to secure admission to the previously segregated University of Mississippi. He attempted to enter campus on September 20, on September 25, and again on September 26. He was blocked by Mississippi Governor Ross Barnett, who said, "[N]o school will be integrated in Mississippi while I am your Governor." The Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals held Barnett and Lieutenant Governor Paul B. Johnson, Jr. in contempt, with fines of more than $10,000 for each day they refused to allow Meredith to enroll.

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sent U.S. Marshals. On September 30, 1962, Meredith entered the campus under their escort. Students and other whites began rioting that evening, throwing rocks and then shooting guns at the U.S. Marshals guarding Meredith. Two people were killed; 28 marshals suffered gunshot wounds; and 160 others were injured. After the Mississippi Highway Patrol withdrew from the campus, President John F. Kennedy sent regular US Army forces to the campus to quell the riot. Meredith began classes the day after the troops arrived.[5]

References[change | edit source]

  1. As of Jan 17, 2012. "U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year 2012 Endowment Market Value and Percentage Change in Endowment Market Value from FY 2010 to FY 2011" (PDF). 2012 NACUBO-Commonfund Study of Endowments. National Association of College and University Business Officers. http://www.nacubo.org/Documents/research/2011_NCSE_Public_Tables_Endowment_Market_Values_Final_January_17_2012.pdf. Retrieved Jan 17, 2012.
  2. [www.olemiss.edu/info/stats_factsOLE MISS FACTS 2011-12]
  3. http://www.olemiss.edu/info/stats_facts.html
  4. Ole Miss Traditions
  5. "James Meredith Integrates Ole Miss", Civil Rights Movement Veterans

Other websites[change | edit source]