Urea

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Urea
Urea Structural Formula V2.svg
Urea-3D-vdW.png
Names
IUPAC name
Aminomethylamide
Other names
Carbamide
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.286
E number E927b (glazing agents, ...)
PubChem {{{value}}}
SMILES {{{value}}}
Properties
(NH2)2CO
Molar mass 60.07 g/mol
Appearance white odourless solid
Density 1.33·10³ kg/m³,[1] solid
Melting point 132.7 °C (406 K)
decomposes
Boiling point n.a.
108 g/100 ml (20 °C)
167 g/100 ml (40 °C)
251 g/100 ml (60 °C)
400 g/100 ml (80 °C)
733 g/100 ml (100 °C)
Acidity (pKa) 0.18
Basicity (pKb) 13.82
Structure
4.56 p/D
Hazards
MSDS ScienceLab.com
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

1
2
0
 
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Urea is an organic compound. It was first found in urine in 1773 by the French chemist Jean Rouelle. It is also called Carbamide, and its chemical names are Carbonyl Diamide (used in inorganic chemistry) and Diaminomethanal (used in organic chemistry).

In humans, it is a normal component of blood and many body tissues. It is produced in the liver, where ammonia, a very toxic substance, is changed into urea, which has a very low toxicity, so low in fact, that it is many times less toxic than table salt. Most of the urea produced in this way is not needed by the body, and is removed from the blood in the kidneys and taken out of the body in urine.

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