User:AJona1992/Dreaming of You

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Dreaming of You
Studio album by
ReleasedJuly 18, 1995
Recorded1994-1995 various recording locations
GenreContemporary R&BPop music • Caribbean music • Latin Pop • Techno music • Tejano Pop • Rancheras • Mexican music
Length49:14 (standard edition)
LabelEMI Records/EMI Latin
ProducerKeith Thomas, Guy Roche, Rhett Lawrence, Arto Lindsay, Susan Rogers, David Byrne, A.B. Quintanilla III, José Hernàndez, Jose Behar
Selena chronology
Amor Prohibido
(1994)
Dreaming of You
(1995)
Siempre Selena
(1996)

Dreaming of You was the sixth and last studio album and second posthumous album by Mexican American singer Selena. The album was released worldwide on July 18, 1995 by EMI Records and EMI Latin. On September 22, 2002, the album was released again for Selena's music collection: "20 Years of Music", which included bonus tracks, music videos and spoken liner notes by her family, friends, and her former band Los Dinos. The album was known as a "double album" - for including unreleased English-language songs, while the rest of the album included Spanish-language songs, some of which were previously unreleased. The first half of the album has slow and mid-tempo R&B ballads and pop songs, while the rest of the album had more of Latin-influences.

Dreaming of You debuted at number one on the U.S. Billboard 200 chart, for selling more than 331,000 copies in its first week, making her the first Hispanic singer to do this, and Dreaming of You the second-highest debut after Michael Jackson's HIStory album. On the same day of the album's release, it had sold more than 175,000 copies, a record for a female pop singer. EMI Records believed the album sold over 700,000 copies, because Billboard didn't include discount stores or the small shops that sell Latin music. Dreaming of You was a commercial success for selling well over 2,000,000 copies in the first year. The album entered the "top ten best-selling debuts of all time" along with being the "best-selling debuts for a female artist". In July 1995, Dreaming of You paced itself as one of Selena's studio albums that stood on the top ten of the "Billboard Top 50 Latin Albums". Dreaming of You also became the highest ranking Spanish-language album to chart "Billboard Top Latin Albums". The album had several singles, while others were for promotional use. The two lead singles from Dreaming of You, "I Could Fall in Love" and the title track, went to chart in over six music categories on Billboard. "I Could Fall in Love" peaked at number-one on Billboard Latin Pop Airplay, while "Dreaming of You" peaked number-twenty-two on Billboard Hot 100. "Captive Heart", "God's Child (Baila Conmigo)", "El Toro Relajo", "Tú Sólo Tú" and "I'm Getting Used To You" were released as promotional singles. "I'm Getting Used To You" peaked at number twenty-three on Billboard Adult Contemporary charts. "Tú Sólo Tú", peaked number-one on both Hot Latin Tracks and Regional Mexican Songs charts.

Production and development[change | change source]

While growing up, Selena had always wanted to record a "big" English-language album[1]. She released her first record in 1984 which only included two English songs[1]. Abraham Quintanilla Jr, father of Selena, raised her to be "true to herself" - with stories of his youth, when his band "Los Dinos" recorded doo-wop music[1]. Quintanilla Jr faced discrimination from White Americans who didn't take kind to Abraham's group singing their type of music. Selena continued to release dominant Spanish-language albums for independent record labels[1]. In 1989, Selena was discovered by Jose Behar, the former head of Sony Music Latin. He believed he witnessed the next "Gloria Estfean"[1]. Before Behar made Selena the first artist to ever sign with EMI Latin, he wanted Selena to record three English-language songs that would ensure EMI Records's pop division the crossover album. After recording "Only Love", "Is It The Beat?", and "Where Did The Feeling Go?", EMI Records weren't convinced that Selena was ready to record a crossover album[2]. They insisted that Selena needed a bigger fan-base.[1]

After becoming the first Tejano artist to certified an album gold, selling more then 500,000 copies and winning a Grammy Award for "Best Mexican-American Album", EMI Latin decided the time was right to propel Selena as an American solo pop artist[2][1]. In November of 1993, Selena was signed to SBK Records, although recording sessions didn't begin until a year later.[3] As the news of Selena becoming a crossover artist, stress-levels began to arise as Selena was put on pressure by the press after her alleged debut date neared.[1] During a private dinner in 1994, Selena and Jose Behar began talking about the crossover album, Selena burst into tears and exclaiming that she hadn't record a song for the album. This angered Behar, as he stormed into the office of EMI Records and demanded the crossover album to begin.[1] Behar told the heads of EMI Records that if Selena doesn't record the album that she and her band are willing to "walk-away" and find another record company.[1] This decision embarked the company to begin the crossover.[1] When "Amor Prohibido" was released in March 1994, Selena announced that her English-language album will be released in July of 1995.[1][4]

Cquote1.png The album is still coming out, we [have] been talking about this forever, forever, forever, how many years has it been? 3 years?'"
Selena telling an interviewer about the release date for her English language album.[4]

Major pop music producers collaborated with Selena, some of which won Grammy Awards for their works. Selena recorded her first song, "I Could Fall in Love" during the late months of 1994. Selena's sister, Suzzette Quintanilla, told Biography that Selena would take extensive time figuring out what she was all about, and what she stood for.[5] Selena told an interviewer that she wasn't going to sing any songs that goes in-depth about sexual situations, which she tried to avoid throughout her career. Recording sessions for the album took place during 1994 to 1995 at several recording studios, including at her father's recording studio, Q-Productions in Corpus Christi, The Bennett House in Franklin, Tennessee, Bananaboat Studio in Burbank, California, Oakshire Recorders in Los Angeles, California, Conway Studios in Hollywood, California, Clinton Studios in Clinton, New York, and Levosia Entertainment in Hollywood, California some recording sessions were done at North Hollywood, California.[6] Producers and songwriters having collaborated with Selena on the album include Keith Thomas, Trey Lorenz who is courtesy of Epic Records, Mark Goldenberg, Kit Hain, Guy Roche, Donna Delorey, Diane Warren, Rhett Lawrence, David Byrne who is courtesy of Luaka Bop Inc., Frane Golde, Tom Snow, Full Force, Brian "Red" Moore, A.B. Quintanilla III, Barrio Boyzz, K.C. Porter, Felipe Bernmejo, Jose Hernandez, Felipe Valdes Leal, and for the Japanese release, Rokusuke Ei and Hachidai Nakamura.[6] Selena's family stepped-back as experienced music producers began working with Selena. This became the first album that the family wasn't with nor had a say-so on any production of Dreaming of You. Selena expressed her feelings towards the decision that EMI Records pursued, stating that she was under a lot of stress.[1]

Track listing[change | change source]

Standard edition[change | change source]

No. TitleWriter(s) Length
1. "I Could Fall in Love"  Keith Thomas 4:41
2. "Captive Heart"  Mark Goldenberg, Kit Hain 4:23
3. "I'm Getting Used to You"  Diane Warren 4:03
4. "God's Child (Baila Conmigo)" (featuring David Byrne)Selena Quintanilla, David Byrne 4:15
5. "Dreaming of You"  Franne Golde, Tom Snow 5:14
6. "Missing My Baby"  A.B. Quintanilla III 4:13
7. "Amor Prohibido"  A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Astudillo 2:55
8. "Wherever You Are (Donde Quiera Que Estés)" (featuring Barrio Boyzz)K. C. Porter, Miguel Flores 4:29
9. "Techno Cumbia"  A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Astudillo 4:44
10. "El Toro Relajo"  Felipe Bermejo 2:20
11. "Como La Flor"  A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Astudillo 3:04
12. "Tú Sólo Tú"  Felipe Valdés Leal 3:12
13. "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom"  Selena Quintanilla, Pete Astudillo 3:41

Japan edition[change | change source]

Source:[7]

20 Years of Music edition[change | change source]

Source:[8]

Credits[change | change source]

Credits are taken from the album's liner notes.[6]

Album credits
  • Selena Quintanilla-Perez (main and back-up vocalist, composer, and ideal)
  • Keith Thomas (Composer, producer)
  • David Byrne (Composer, guitar, harmonium, percussion)
  • Kit Hain (Composer)
  • Tom Snow (Composer)
  • Pete Astudillo (Composer)
  • Franne Golde (Composer)
  • Mark Goldenberg (Composer)
  • Diane Warren (Composer)
  • K.C. Porter (Composer, engineer)
  • Felipe Valdés Leal (Composer)
  • Los Kumbia Kings (Composer)
  • Trey Lorenz (back-up vocalist)
  • Guy Roche (producer, keyboards, synthesizer)
  • Nathaniel "Mick" Guzaski (mixer)
  • Mario Luccy (engineer)
  • Brian "Red" Moore (engineer, mixer, recorder)
  • Moana Suchard (engineer and assistant engineer)
  • Marc Antonie (guitar)
  • Neil Stubenhauss (bass)
  • Art Meza (percussion)
  • Delphine (synth programming)
  • Donna Delorey (back-up vocalist)
  • Rhett Lawrence (producer, arranger, synthesizers, drums, programming)
  • Dan Garcia (engineer)
  • Carl Harris Jr (assistant engineer)
  • Luis Conte (percussion)
  • Jerry Hey (horns)
  • Dan Higgens (horns)
  • Gary Grant (horns)
  • Bill Reichenbac (horns)
  • Joanie Smith (production coordination)
  • Chris Kholer (computer technician)
  • Arto Lindsay (producer)
  • Susan Rogers (producer, engineer)
  • Paul Socolow (bass)
  • Todd Turkisher (drums)
  • Valerie Naranjo (marimba)
  • Michael Brauer (mixer)
  • Full Force (back-up vocals, co-producer, additional arranger, additional keyboards, drum programming, remixer)
  • A.B. Quintanilla III (producer, arranger, bass)
  • Ricky Vela (keyboards, additional keyboards, drum programming)
  • Joe Ojeda (keyboards)
  • Chris Perez (guitar)
  • Suzette Quintanilla Arriaga (drums)
  • Gerry E. Brown (re-mixer)
  • Kurt Lundvall (assistant engineer)
  • Bill Molina (digital editing)
  • Nick Moroch (additional guitar)
  • Barrio Boyzz (back-up vocalist)
  • Tim Conklin (additional engineer)
  • Perry Tembelis (assistant engineer)
  • Tony Peluso (mixer)
  • Mike Aavold (mixing assistant)
  • Manuel Hernandez (English translation)
  • Maria Grever (English translation)
  • Jose Hernandez (arranger, producer)
  • Mariachi Sol de Mexico (chorus, back-up vocalist)
  • Robb Bros. Productions (mixer)
  • Bruce Robb (engineer)
  • Nancy Brennan (art, concept)
  • Abraham Quintanilla Jr (management)
  • Jose Behar (art direction)
  • Barbie Insua (art direction)
  • Margo Chase (pacakage deisgn)
  • Brian Hunt (pacakage deisghn)
  • Marucie Rinaldi (photography)
  • Charles Koppelman (EMI Records)
  • Manolo Gonzalez (EMI Latin)
  • Mario Ruiz (EMI Latin)
  • Daviit Sigerson (EMI Records)
  • John Lannert (biography)
  • Rokusuke Ei (composer) Japan release
  • Hachidai Nakamura (composer) Japan release
  • Hitoshi Namekata (managing) Japan release
  • Amaya Haruka (Japanese translation) Japan release
  • Emi Natsuki (Japanese translation) Japan release
  • Eun Jung (Korean translation) Korean release
  • Sun P. Jung (Korean translation) Korean release
  • Jake Lee (A&R Manager) Korean release

Charts[change | change source]

Album charts[change | change source]

Certifications[change | change source]

Notes^ Note that Recording Industry Association of America has launched its Oro y De Platino certification scheme for those albums the 50% of the content of which are in Spanish, initially, the award-levels for Oro y De Platino were: Gold=100,000 and Platinum=200,000.[19] In February 2008, Recording Industry Association of America reduced the certification-award-levels for Oro y De Platino to Gold=50,000 and Platinum=100,000.[20]

Country/Region Certification Sales
United States[21] 35x Platinum (Certification type: Latin) 3,500,000
Canada[22] Gold 50,000

Awards and nominations[change | change source]

Release history[change | change source]

1995[change | change source]

List of radio add dates with formats
Country Date Format Label
United States[28] July 18, 1995 CD (Standard Edition) EMI Records/EMI Latin
Canada[29]
Netherlands[30]
Denmark[31]
Belgium[32]
Thailand[33]
Australia[34]
Germany[35]
France[36]
United Kingdom[37]
New Zealand[34]
Colombia[38]
Malaysia[39]
Taiwan[39]
Korea[39]
Ecuador[39][40]
Spain[41]
Hong Kong[42]
Austria[43]
Switzerland[44]
Ireland[45]
Mexico[46]
Japan[39] Bonus Tracks Edition EMI Music Japan

2002 re-release[change | change source]

Country Date Format Label
United States[47] September 22, 2002 20 Years of Music Collection EMI Latin Music
Canada[48]
Australia[49]
France[50]
Germany[51]
Spain[52]
Austria[53]
Philippines[54]
Portugal[55]
Turkey[56]
Italy[57]
Switzerland[58]
Ireland[59]
Japan[60] EMI Music Japan/Toshiba EMI Limited

See also[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 Queen of Tejano Music, Selena special. Q-Productions. N/A, Corpus Christi. 2007. 60 minutes in.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Doug Minnick (24 September 2010). "Jose Behar, interview". Taxi A&R. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  3. Selena talks about her crossover album. Telefutra, Corpus Christi. 20 January 1995. 25 minutes in.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Ruiz, Geraldo (1995). Selena: The Last Song. Warner Pub Service. ISBN 9781887599016. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  5. Biography: Selena. A&E. N/A. 2007. 60 minutes in.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 EMI Telvisia (1995) Selena - Dreaming of You (Liner Notes) EMI Records.
  7. "Japanese album of Dreaming of You". Eil.com. Retrieved 29 September 2010.
  8. "Dreaming of You special tracks". Barnes and Nobel. Retrieved 29 September 2010.
  9. "The Billboard 200 – Dreaming of You – Selena Week of August 5, 1995". Billboard. Nielsen Business, Inc. 5 August 1995. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 "Archive music charts for Dreaming of You". Allmusicguide.con. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  11. 11.0 11.1 "Selena's chart history". Billboard. Retrieved 8 February 2011.
  12. 12.0 12.1 "Dreaming of You music charts archived". Allmusicguide.com. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  13. "Dreaming of You (song) chart history". Billboard. Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  14. "I Could Fall in Love chart history". Billboard. Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  15. "I'm Getting Used To You chart history". Billboard. Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  16. 16.0 16.1 "Latin Pop Songs Chart History of Selena". Billboard. Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  17. "Mexican Regional Songs Chart History of Selena". Billboard. Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  18. "Selena's Recording Industry Association of America chart history". Billboard. Recording Industry Association of America. 5 August 1995. Retrieved 20 December 2010.
  19. "RIAA Launches "Los Premios de Oro y De Platino" to Recognize Top Latin Artists". Recording Industry Association of America. January 25, 2000. Retrieved 2010-05-22.
  20. "Country Takes The Crop". Recording Industry Association of America. February 14, 2008. Retrieved 2010-05-22.
  21. "Selena's US Certifications on Dreaming of You". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2010-05-22.
  22. "Canadian Gold Award for Dreaming of You". Eil.com. Retrieved 29 September 2010.
  23. "1995 Lo Nuestro Awards" (in Spanish). LN.com. 25 September 2010.
  24. "Past Tejano Music Awards Nominations". TMA's. 25 September 2010.
  25. Cite error: The named reference MiGente was used but no text was provided for refs named (see the help page).
  26. Cite error: The named reference twomillion was used but no text was provided for refs named (see the help page).
  27. Cite error: The named reference musicawards was used but no text was provided for refs named (see the help page).
  28. "Dreaming of You Release Details". RateYourMusic. 25 September 2010. Retrieved 25 September 2010.
  29. "Release History of Dreaming of You". RateYourMusic. 23 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  30. "Dreaming of You Standard Dutch Edition" (in Dutch). Bol.com. 24 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  31. "Dreaming of You Denmark iTunes" (in Danish). iTunes.com.dk. Retrieved 28 April 2011.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  32. "Dreaming of You Belgium iTunes". iTunes.com.be. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  33. "Dreaming of You Double Edition". BoomerangShop.com. 24 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  34. 34.0 34.1 "Dreaming of You on Australia iTunes". iTunes.com.au. 24 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  35. "Dreaming of You album" (in German). Amazon.com.de. 24 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  36. "Dreaming of You album" (in French). Amazon.com.fr. 24 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  37. "Dreaming of You album". Amazon.com.uk. 24 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  38. "Dreaming of You Colombian Version". Eil. 29 September 2010. Retrieved 29 September 2010.
  39. 39.0 39.1 39.2 39.3 39.4 EMI Records International (1995) Selena – Dreaming of You (Liner Notes) EMI Records.
  40. "Dreaming of You Ecuador edition". Eil. 29 September 2010. Retrieved 29 September 2010.
  41. "Dreaming of You Standard Edition" (in Spanish). 7Digital.com. 24 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  42. "DREAMING OF YOU (BONUS TRACKS) (LTD) (RMST) (ENH)(US Version)". Yesasia. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  43. "Dreaming of You Austria iTunes" (in German). iTunes.com.at. Retrieved 28 April 2011.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  44. "Dreaming of You von Selena" (in German). Musicload.ch. Retrieved 28 April 2011.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  45. "Dreaming of You Ireland iTunes". iTunes.com.ie. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  46. "Dreaming of You Mexico iTunes" (in Spanish). iTunes.com.mx. Retrieved 28 April 2011.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  47. "Dreaming of You Special Edition". Amazon.com. 25 September 2010. Retrieved 25 September 2010.
  48. "Dreaming of You Special Edition". Amazon.com.ca. 25 September 2010. Retrieved 25 September 2010.
  49. "Dreaming of You Australia iTunes". Amazon.com.au. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  50. "Dreaming of You Special Edition" (in French). Amazon.com.fr. 25 September 2010. Retrieved 25 September 2010.
  51. "Dreaming of You Extra One Track" (in German). Amazon.com.de. 25 September 2010. Retrieved 25 September 2010.
  52. "Dreaming of You Double Edition" (in Spanish). 7Digital.com. 24 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
  53. "Dreaming of You 20 Years of Music Austria iTunes" (in German). iTunes.com.at. Retrieved 28 April 2011.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  54. "Dreaming of You Philippines iTunes" (in Tagalog). iTunes.com.pi. Retrieved 28 April 2011.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  55. "Dreaming of You Portugal iTunes" (in Portuguese). iTunes.com.po. Retrieved 28 April 2011.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  56. "Dreaming of You Turkey iTunes" (in Turkish). iTunes.com.tu. Retrieved 28 April 2011.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  57. "Dreaming of You Italy iTunes" (in Italian). iTunes.com.it. Retrieved 28 April 2011.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  58. "Dreaming of You (20 years of music) von Selena" (in German). Musicload.ch. Retrieved 28 April 2011.CS1 maint: Unrecognized language (link)
  59. "Dreaming of You Ireland iTunes". iTunes.com.ie. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  60. "Dreaming of You on Japan Amazon.com" (in Japanese). Amazon.com.jp. 24 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.

Further reading[change | change source]

  • Joe Nick Patoski. Selena Como La Flor. Little Brown and Company. ISBN 0316693782.
  • Geraldo Ruiz. Selena: The Last Song. Warner Pub Service. ISBN 1887599010.

External links[change | change source]

Preceded by
Cracked Rear View by Hootie & the Blowfish
Billboard 200 number-one album
August 5, 1995 – August 11, 1995
Succeeded by
E. 1999 Eternal by Bone Thugs N Harmony
Preceded by
Amor Prohibido by Selena
Vivir by Enrique Iglesias
Billboard Top Latin Albums number-one album
August 5, 1995 – May 18, 1996
April 12, 1997 – April 19, 1997
Succeeded by
Enrique Iglesias by Enrique Iglesias
Vivir by Enrique Iglesias