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Amor Prohibido
Studio album by
ReleasedMarch 26, 1994 (1994-03-26) (U.S.)
(see release history)
Recorded1993
Various recording locations
GenreProgressive Cumbia, Contemporary Tejano Pop, Salsa, Techno, Dance-pop, Funk, Rock en Español, Latin pop, Reggae, Confessional Ballads, Mariachi, Ranchera
Length32:37
LabelEMI, EMI Latin
ProducerA.B. Quintanilla III, José Behar, Jorge Alberto Pino, Guillermo Johnson Page, Gregg Vickers, Brain "Red" Moore

"Amor Prohibido" (English: Forbidden Love) is the fifth studio album by Mexican American Tejano pop singer Selena. The album was first released on March 26, 1994, and was re-released, being part of the 20 Years of Music Collection series, on September 24, 2002, with extra tracks, music videos, and spoken liner notes by her family, friends, and her former band, by EMI Records and EMI Latin.[1] The album incorporates mostly Cumbia and Dance-pop songs in Spanish, which later helped shaped the "Tejano Music Movement". The album was scheduled to be released in early-1994 to be the final Spanish-language album by Selena. Production of the album began late due to Selena's booming-success of her clothing line, boutiques and her extensive touring for her previous album, Selena Live!, which Selena won her first Grammy Award.

Selena recorded songs that were multifarious of Tejano music and Mexican music, well received by critics. Debuting at number-one on Billboard Regional Mexican Albums. While peaking at number twenty-nine on Billboard 200 and number-one on Billboard Top Latin Albums, the album sold more than 500,000 copies in its first year, it eventually became one of the "biggest selling Latin albums of all time". The album was certified gold by RIAA in April 1995, platinum in May of that year, and finally double Platinum in October 2002, representing shipping of 2,000,000 copies. In February 2010 the certification was reissued as 20× Disco De Platino. Promotion of the album began with the start of Selena's worldwide tour in April 1994. The album received mostly positive reviews and was given high praise, for "stepping-out" of the Tejano genre and into Contemporary Latin pop music. Eventually, Amor Prohibido was nominated for "Best Mexican-American Performance" at the 37th Grammy Awards, while the album won four prestigious awards, either from Lo Nuestro or the Tejano Music Awards.

The album spawned four number-one singles (one posthumous) on the Billboard Hot Latin Tracks chart, which became the only Spanish-album by a female artist to achieve this feat. The four leading singles from Amor Prohibido were "the title-track", "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom", "No Me Queda Más" and "Fotos y Recuerdos". While the singles peaked at number-one on the Hot Latin Tracks, some of the songs also peaked at number-one on the Regional Mexican Airplay and were in the top-ten on many other music charts on Billboard.

Production and development[change | change source]

After Selena had won her first Grammy Award for her fifth studio and first live album, "Selena Live!" at the 35th Grammy Awards[2][3][4] preparations began for developing Selena's final Spanish-language studio album. Selena's brother, who was the producer of her music, A.B. Quintanilla III, was assigned lead-producer by EMI Latin's president Jose Behar. Quintanilla III, quickly assembled Pete Astudillo and Ricky Vela for ideas and inspiration in productive-writing. Chris Perez, the widow of Selena, was approached by Quintanilla III to collaborate with him on a rock song, written entirely in Spanish. Perez stated, during an interview with a family friend, Brain "Red" Moore, that he was shocked and surprised that Abe allowed him to write a song by himself. With not enough lyrics to complete a full-length album, Quintanilla III began writing songs directly out of the Tejano music genre and into Contemporary Latin pop music. When asked if he was trying to changed Selena's style of music, Quintanilla III replied that he didn't want to "write the same songs continuously", he also commented on the question, stating that he wanted to keep the band's image fresh and "cool" so it can be accessible to a younger audience, which helped expanded the "Tejano Music Movement". The movement, which at the time was only a movement in the state of Texas, helped further awareness of Tejano music and it becoming a popular trend. Quintanilla Jr, kept the album further immersed in the Latin territory, sticking to mixing of the genres such as Latin jungle and Latin soul into the songs he had wrote for the album.

Beginning in January 1994 and ending in mid-February 1994, recording sessions were mostly done and remixed at Selena's father's, Abraham Quintanilla Jr, recording studio; Q-Productions. Some recording sessions were done at Tejano singer Manny Guerra's recording studio, and in Hollywood, California. Selena used three recording studios simultaneously. Producers and songwriters having collaborated with Selena on the album include A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Asudillo, Ricky Vela, Chris Perez, Bebu Silvetti, Joe Ojeda, Brain "Red" Moore and Jorge Alberto Pino. For the 20 Years of Music collection Miguel Flores, Desmond Child and K. C. Porter were associated with "Donde Quiera Que Estes", which was a duet that Selena corroborated with the Barrio Boyzz. Additionally, she collaborated with some musicians that she had never worked with in the past, Stephanie Lynn had done back up vocals for "Amor Prohibido" as well as Rick Alvarez. Composer, José Luis Borrego had worked with Selena on the track "Cobrarde" ("Coward"). Lead vocalist for The Pretenders, Chrissy Hynde was given lyric rights for the song "Fotos y Recuredos", which was a sample of their single "Back On The Chain Gang". Puerto Rican American producer, Domingo Padilla had filled in for Moore for the duet with the Barrio Boyzz. Gregg Vickers, Roger Emerson, Steven Torres and James Moore also worked with Selena for the first time on Amor Prohibido.

Selena later revealed that some songs that were written, such as an unreleased English-language song, didn't make the final cut. Quintanilla III later responded, that the songs that didn't make it on the album were going to be enlisted in Selena's forthcoming Tejano-influenced album, which was projected to be released several months after the initial release of Selena's crossover attempt. After Selena was murdered on March 31, 1995, the songs remained unreleased. While Perez was working on an upcoming Rock-project with Nando "Guero" Dominguez, a half-Puerto Rican and half-Dominican singer, Dominguez was having pitch problems. Selena decided to help out by creating a duet on the song, which she completed after one take, on the same day. "Puede Ser" ("It Could Be") was going to be released on Amor Prohibido but was pulled off for unknown reasons, the song was then projected to be on the Tejano album, however, after Selena's death, the single became an unreleased song, later being released on Momentos Intimos ("Intimate Moments") in March 2004.

Composition[change | change source]

Musical styles and lyrics[change | change source]

"Amor Prohibido" the lead single off the album Amor Prohibido was written and produced by Jorge Alberto Pino, Bebu Silvetti, A.B. Quintanilla III, Jose Behar, Pete Astudillo and Abraham Quintanilla Jr.[5] The song, which incorporates Tejano pop and Latin pop, won both the Premio Lo Nuestro Awards for "Pop Ballad of the Year" and was awarded "Regional Mexican Song of the Year" for three consecutive years, starting in 1995.[6] During the Tejano Music Awards, the single won all nominated awards.[7] The song also won the "Latin Pop Award" during the Broadcast Music Incorporated Awards in 1995[8] and won the "Billboard Latin Music Awards" in 1996.[9][10] Amor Prohibido was critically praised for Selena's choice in "stepping out" of the Tejano music world because the song was taken directly out of the genre of Tejano music and had Latin American sounds and rhythm.[11] Furthermore the song became the "biggest hit" in Selena's career.[3] Quintanilla III, the brother of Selena and the producer of her music, had written songs out of the boundaries of Tejano music,[12] which led Selena to become the "Queen of Tejano music" due to her being the first and only Tejano artist to have achieved this feat.[12] Ramiro Burr stated that "The hits were obvious—the eloquent "Amor Prohibido," on love conducted in secret", the song also was the first of his named "hits" for the album.[13] The single, was also named the first of three AMG Track Picks for Amor Prohibido[14] About.com added Selena's single "Dreaming of You" on "The Top 12 Spanish language songs that have been played on English language radio", while doing so, About.com stated that "the album of the same name includes "Amor Prohibido" and "Como La Flor," both of which enjoyed popularity in Latin America" during their scoring.[15] With "Amor Prohibido" and thirteen other of Selena's top-ten singles in the Top Latin Songs chart, she was named "top Latin artist of the '90s" and "Best selling Latin artist of the decade" by Billboard.[16] "Amor Prohibido" and "No Me Queda Más", became the most successful singles of 1994 and 1995 in the United States Latino community and Mexico.[17][18] Amor Prohibido debuted number thirteen on April 13, 1994, on the US Hot Latin Tracks on Billboard shortly after the album's release in 1994.[19] The song later peaked at number one seven weeks after its release on June 11, 1994.[20] The single spent nine weeks at number one while the single spent a total of twenty weeks on the Hot Latin Tracks.[21] "Amor Prohibido" debuted and peaked at number five on the US Billboard Latin Regional Mexican Airplay, the single spent three weeks on the chart.[22] The song describes a relationship between a man and a woman in which their love is tested by poverty, differences and parental disapproval.

"Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" was the second single released from Amor Prohibido. The song was written and produced by Selena, A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Astudillo, and Chris Perez, the widow of Selena. The song, widely known as one of Selena's signature songs, was awarded "Most performed song of the year" at the 1996 Broadcast Music Incorporated Latin Awards[9][23] At the 1994 Tejano Music Awards, "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" was awarded "Song of the year", while at the 2010 Tejano Music Awards, the song was awarded "Best 1990s song".[24] The song was highly liked by children[25] and was covered in various children compilation albums after the singers' death. The song was highly praised for its' reggae-inflected dance flare sounds. Alberto Rivera, of El Universo believed that it was one of the first Spanish-Reggae songs to have ever reached number-one on Billboard's Hot Latin Tracks.[26] He also commented on Jennifer Lopez's performance of the song during the Selena movie, "[...] and Jennifer Lopez's performance of "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" was very interesting. A Puerto Rican dancing to a Mexican-American singer's song, shows how you can be from a different lifestyle but can also enjoy others as well. This is a great example of how we Hispanics should see view other."[26] Bidi Bidi Bom Bom had extensive airplay throughout the United States,[27] peaking at number one on Billboard Hot Latin Tracks, it became the second-number-one single off of Amor Prohibido.[28] The song was an experimental and wasn't planned to be part of Amor Prohibido.[12] Quintanilla III, had wanted to write another up-tempo cumbia song, however, Perez added his solo guitar sounds and rhythms, which later transformed the song into a reggae sound.[12] Selena's harmony, which originally was about a fish living in the ocean, transition the song to a dance-pop rhythm.[12] The songs lyrics' describes about a girl who is interested in a guy that just walked by her, making her heart palpitate. Selena leaked the song, before recording sessions began, during a live concert in Corpus Christi, Texas in English.[12] The version Selena sang that night, was about a fish swimming in the open ocean feeling free, which is in contrast of the studio version.[12] The single debuted at number 30 in the Billboard Hot Latin Tracks chart on August 13, 1994.[29] The track climb to number ten the next week and peaked at number-one on October 22, 1994,[30] spending four weeks at the summit.[28] The song reentered the chart on April 15, 1995[31] (the week after Selena's death) at number six.[28] "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" peaked within the top ten in the Latin Regional Mexican Airplay chart[29] and the Latin Pop Songs chart.[30]

"No Me Queda Mas" was the third single released from Amor Prohibido. The song was written and produced by Ricky Vela, A.B. Quintanilla III and Bebu Silvetti. The accompanying music video was awarded "Video of the Year" at the 1995 Latin Music Awards.[32] At the 1997 Broadcast Music Incorporated Latin Awards the song was nominated for "Song of the Year".[33] The song was highly praised for its "touchy ballad"-taste. Ramiro Burr praised "No Me Queda Mas" as a "lovely and stoic song facing the end, yet keeping a sense of dignity and self-worth".[34] Raúl Manuel Rodríguez of El Dictamen highly praised the song stating that "Selena did an extremely awesome job when she recorded this song. I remember when I first heard it on the radios. No Me Queda Mas is, in my opinion, one of Selena's best songs. A lovely ballad that will not die".[35] Rodríguez also said that "[...] No Me Queda Mas is an example of where Selena [was] heading to, and that was crossover super-stardom."[35] He also said that "[...] the song gives so much pride to us Hispanics, especially us Mexicans. This song is just a masterpiece.[35] It later peaked at number one on Billboard's Hot Latin Tracks, and became the third-number-one single off of Amor Prohibido.[36] "No Me Queda Mas", was written, out of emotions, by Ricky Vela: who had a crush on Selena's sister, Suzette Quintanilla. When Vela was introduced to Suzette's husband, Billy, Vela was full of anger and was jealous from Billy. Vela decided to write his frustrations to Suzette, with a poem. After Vela finished writing the poem, he later turned it into a Spanish ballad song. Quintanilla III, later viewed the song and immediately wanted Selena to record the song for her new album. The song describes an emotional distraught woman who had recently fallen in love with a man, but later finds out he is getting married. The women then feels like there's nothing left to live for without being with him.

"Fotos y Recuerdos" was the fourth single released from Amor Prohibido. The song was originally written by Chrissie Hynde, with spanish translation by Ricky Vela, and was produced by A.B. Quintanilla III.[37] The song, was a cover version of The Pretenders song "Back On The Chain Gang," with Selena's version featuring all-new Spanish lyrics.[38][39][40] The song was retitled "Fotos y Recuerdos," (which translates as "Photos and Memories"), and even though there were no references to prisoners in the Spanish lyrics, Selena's version sampled the chain-gang chant hook in the chorus.[41] The song was highly praised by music crictics who believed the song was an "improvement" from the Pretenders version. The song entered the Billboard Hot Latin Tracks chart, peaking at number-one for seven weeks, giving Selena her fourth-number-one song off of Amor Prohibido, which peaked at number-one posthumously[42][43] and overall giving Selena her sixth top-charting number-one song for April 1995.[44] At the time of Selena's death, the song was positioned at number four.[45][46] A music video done by Telemundo, featured a montage of various Selena clips from previous music videos, before her death.[47]

"Techno Cumbia" was released as the fourth single from Amor Prohibido. It was written by A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Astudillo and Ricky Vela, while it was produced by A.B., and Brian "Red" Moore, a family friend who helped with audio mixing. The song was a Technopop cumbia song performed in a moderate Reggae groove.[41] It drew influences from dancehall, ska,[41] two-step, dance-club, nortec,[48] drum and bass,[49] dancehall-rap en español,[50] and salsa funk.[51] The remixed version found on Dreaming of You (1995) has a key signature set in C minor.[52] "Techno Cumbia" is also influenced with R&B, blues and funk.[52] Selena insisted that she should rap in the opening of the song, which was not originally planned.[53] In the recording studio, Los Dinos helped with back-up vocals while A.B. did a rap verse during the bridge.[53] Guadalupe San Miguel, argued that "Techno Cumbia", "Como La Flor" and "La Carcacha" were her biggest Cumbia hits.[54] Michael Joseph Corcoran stated that "Techno Cumbia" had Michael Jackson-like trills, in his book about heroes in Texas music.[55] Herón Márquez of Latin Sensations wrote that "[...] the song signaled a new style of Tejano music."[56] Joe Nick Patoski, wrote about "Techno Cumbia" 's different taste in music genres, had helped it to be more acceptable to the Spanish-international market, "The most compelling tunes were the ones aimed at the Spanish-international market: "Techno Cumbia", which honored the most popular rhythm coursing through the Latin music world while updating it with vocal samples, second line drumming from New Orleans, and horn charts inspired by soca from the Caribbean".[57] "Techno Cumbia" was nominated for "Single of The Year" and "Song of The Year" at the 1994 Tejano Music Awards.[7] However, the song won the "Tejano Crossover Song of the Year" category, beating out "Missing My Baby" and "I'm Getting Used To You".[7] At the 1995 Tejano Music Awards, the remix version was nominated for "Song of The Year", while the music video was nominated for "Tejano Music Video of the Year" at the 1997 Tejano Music Awards.[7] During the 2010 Tejano Music Award's "Decade-Ballots", "Techno Cumbia" was nominated for "Best 1990s Song".[7] According to Billboard, "Techno Cumbia" was believed to be the earliest templates of pop-cumbia-rap fusions.[58] After Selena's death, her brother A.B. Quintanilla formed a reggaeton band called "Los Kumbia Kings" in the late '90s. The two singles "Shhh!" and "Boom Boom", which were both released from the album Shhh! (2001) were believed to be the decedents of "Techno Cumbia".[58] "Techno Cumbia" was featured on The Billboard Book of Number One Albums in 1996.[28] "Techno Cumbia" was chosen to be part of the Selena Forever Play in 2000, staring Veronica Vasquez as "Selena".[59] The song peaked at number-one on the Hot Latin Tracks and the Latin Regional Mexican Airplay, becoming Selena's fourth-number-one song off of Amor Prohibido.[60] The song also peaked in the Latin Pop Songs,[60] Canadian Hot 100 and the Spanish Top 50 Songs.[61] The song's lyrics talks about Selena showing club-goers a new type of dance called "The Techno Cumbia".

"Si Una Vez" was released as the fifth single from Amor Prohibido. It was first intended for Astudillo's debut album, but was later given to Selena to record. Becoming a progressive cumbia with experimental music that incorporates both Mariachi and Rancheras. The song, according to Billboard, is one of Selena's signature songs.[62] While winning the BMI Pop Music Award in 1994 for "Song of The Year", the song became the second song, behind "No Me Queda Más", to be written out-of-emotions from Selena's band Los Dinos.[63] Quintanilla III, while being interviewed for Selena's collection: 20 Years of Music, stated that "Si Una Vez" was an experimental music and helped boost Amor Prohibido as a progressive cumbia album, with its Mariachi Cumbia rhythms.[53] Vela, who also was interviewed, revealed that the band wanted to performed with the Guitarrón guitar, instead of the traditional guitars that they had used for the other songs in the album.[53] Vela also confess of using a Mariachi trumpet, with a moderate Cumbia-beat, while stating that Si Una Vez was one of his favorite songs on the album.[53] The song was highly praised for its empowerment with women. Nathan Cone, from the Texas Public Radio, said "the song "resonates best" with South Texas".[64] Entertainment Weekly editor David Browne stated, "At least half of Amor Prohibido showcases her conjunto side: "Si Una Vez", which, with its mariachi horns and Selena's own full-throated warbling, recalls Lydia Mendoza, conjunto's leading lady."[65] Good Housekeeping told subscribers that "Si Una Vez is an admirable and convincing song you have to listen to when dealing with jerks!".[66] Terra named "Si Una Vez" as one of Selena's "most famous works" along with her other singles "El Chico Del Apartamento 512", "Amor Prohibido" and "Fotos y Recuerdos".[67] The lyrics describes a women feeling regretful of loving a man who does not know what love is. She tells him that she regrets ever being with him and that she will never fall for him again. Astudillo's first draft was written from a man's point-of-view after he was dumped by his girlfriend. The song was later transformed to appeal to younger audiences and for Selena to record.[63] Peaking at number four on Billboard' Regional Mexican Songs chart in 1994, the single stood on the chart for nearly twenty-three weeks.[68] After Selena's death, the song took in more extensive airplay throughout the United States, especially in Spanish-speaking radio stations.[69]

"El Chico Del Apartamento 512" was the sixth single released from Amor Prohibido. The song was written and produced by A.B. Quintanilla III, Ricky Vela, Joshua Munoz, Bebu Silvetti, Steven Torres and James Moore. Selena's brother, Quintanilla III stated that "El Chico Del Apartamento 512" was a "Colombian Cumbia" song, while being interviewed for Selena's collection: "20 Years of Music". The song was given mixed reviews from music critics who complained about the commercial performance of the song. Raúl Manuel Rodríguez of El Dictamen, believed "El Chico Del Aparamento 512" was "a wonderful piece from [Vela], who had never let [us] down with his great works" and ended with his review stating that the song could have done better, commercially, if Selena was alive to promote it.[35] Carlos Meléndez, of El Nuevo Día commented on A.B.'s choice for selecting the song saying that "Selena already had great songs on her [Amor Prohibido] album, but if A.B. had picked another song similar to "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom", the album would have been way better."[70] La Jornada, editor Gabriela Herrera wrote that "El Chico Del Apartamento 512" is one of my favorite songs from Selena. It really shows off her talents".[71] The song's lyrics describes about a women who seeks out for true love, while, along the way men who aren't Selena's "type of guy" tries to approach her. Selena goes through a few guys, before finding the "man of her dreams" who is in the apartment room number 512. Her heart is then broken when a White American woman opens the door.

Release[change | change source]

Amor Prohibido stood on Billboard's Top 50 Latin albums, taking the number one and two slots, respectively.[72] It remained at number one for five consecutive weeks.[4] "No Me Queda Más" and "Amor Prohibido" became the most successful singles of 1994 and 1995 in the United States and Mexico.[17][18] Later that month, "Amor Prohibido" peaked at number one on Billboard Hot Latin Tracks. In December 1994, the album "Amor Prohibido" sold more than 400,000 copies, which was "unheard of" for a Tejano artist, Selena and La Mafia were the only Tejano singers to accomplished this feat.[72] By fall of 1994, Amor Prohibido was a commercial success in Mexico and made four number one hits, replacing Gloria Estefan's Mi Tierra on the chart's number one spot. It sold over 400,000 copies by late 1994 in the U.S. and another 50,000 copies in Mexico, reaching gold status.[73][74][75] Amor Prohibido was nominated for a Grammy Award for "Best Mexican-American Performance" at the 37th Grammy Awards.[3][76][77] After Selena's death, in June 1995, the album was certified Platinum with over one million copies sold.[4][78]

The album spawned four number-one hits, which made Selena the first Hispanic singer to accomplished this feat.[79] "Fotos y Recuerdos" peaked at number one posthumously.[4] Before Selena was murdered, Amor Prohibido sold barely 2,000 units a week, after her death the sales of the album soared to a 135% increase when it had sold 28,238 copies in one week in April 1995.[80] The album was believed to help Selena become the "most successful artist of the decade".[81] Amor Prohibido was among the "best selling albums of the United States".[82]

Selena's duet with the Barrio Boyzz, "Donde Quiera Que Estés" ("Wherever You Are"), reached number one in the Billboard Latin Charts. This prompted Selena to tour in New York City, Argentina, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and Central America.[83] Songs from Amor Prohibido such as the title track and "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" were favored among LGBT Americans because of the lyrical content meaning. Songs off the album continue to share spins at LGBT clubs and at drag shows across the United States.[84]

The success of the album helped Selena "shape Tejano music" to be more accessible to a younger and wider audiences, which had never been done in the history of Tejano music.[3]

Promotion[change | change source]

Amor Prohibido Tour[change | change source]

The Amor Prohibido Tour broke several attendance records, most notably the Houston Astrodome concert, where Selena had performed to a record of over 65,000 fans—more than country stars such as George Strait, Vince Gill and Reba McEntire.[3][85] Selena was named "La Onda Chicana [Selena]" ("The Selena Wave") in Italian.[3] Because of the success of the album, Selena was in constant demand and had little time to record her crossover album.[86] Michael Clark of Houston Chronicle, wrote that "Her appearance at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo on Feb. 26, 1995, was supposed to be not only a celebration of Amor Prohibido's success, but also a preview of things to come[...]".[87] Clark also stated that the concert was "historic" for being her final televised concert.[87] Selena toured for the first time in Guatemala.[87]

Singles[change | change source]

Other singles[change | change source]

"Donde Quiera Que Estés"

Other songs[change | change source]

"Ya No"

"Cobarde"

"Tus Desprecios"

Reception[change | change source]

Commercial performance[change | change source]

Amor Prohibido debuted on the US Billboard 200 chart at number 183 in June 1994 but promptly slipped off the chart.[88] The album reentered the Billboard 200 chart at number 92 following Selena's death.[88] The following week it took the 36 slot respectively,[88] before it peaked at number 29.[89] On the Billboard Latin 50 chart, Amor Prohibido peaked at number one, it remained on the chart hovering the top five slots since the albums release.[88] The album peaked at number-one on the Billboard Latin Regional Mexican Albums and Latin Albums chart.[88] Amor Prohibido peaked at number 18 on the Heatseekers Albums chart.[90][91] The album was certified 2x Platinum in the United States for selling over 2 million copies. It also received a Latin issue of 20x Platinum representing shipments of 2 million units. The album sold over 4 million copies by 1996, while by 2002 the album sold over 8 million copies. It was issued a Diamond certification in the United States for sales of 10 million copies in February 2011.

The album debuted on the Mexican Albums Chart at number-one in April 8, 1994.[92] It remained there for a total of seven weeks.[92] Amor Prohibido remained on the chart hovering in the top 20 before Selena was murdered.[92] On the following week of Selena's death the album was positioned at number-one and remained there for five months.[92] Amor Prohibido peaked and debuted at number three on the Italian Albums Chart on June 30, 1995.[92] It remained in the top 40 for two months.[92] The album also debuted in the top ten in the Canadian Albums Chart and the Brazil Albums Chart.[92] While it debuted in the top twenty in the Argentina Albums Chart, Portuguese Albums Chart and the Spanish Albums Chart.[92]

The album was certified Platinum by the Federation of the Italian Music Industry for selling over 100,000 copies in 1996.[92] With a Diamond certification from the Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers, the album sold over 250,000 copies in that country.[92] In Canada, the album was certified Gold for sales of 50,000 units.[92] In Mexico the album was certified Diamond with sales of over 500,000 copies from the Asociación Mexicana de Productores de Fonogramas y Videogramas.[92] In Portugal the album was certified Gold with sales of over 10,000 unites by the Associação Fonográfica Portuguesa.[92] The album sold over 60,000 copies in Spain and was certified Platinum by the Productores de Música de España.[92]

Amor Prohibido won "Album of the Year – Orchestra" and "Record of the Year" at the 1994 Tejano Music Awards.[93] At the 1995 Lo Nuestro Awards the album won "Regional/Mexican Album of the Year" and "Pop Balad of the Year".[81] The album led Selena to win "Female Vocalist of The Year",[93] "Female Artist of the Year", "Female Entertainer of the Year" and "Song (artist/songwriter) of the Year" at the 1995 Tejano Music Awards and the 1995 Lo Nuestro Awards.[81]

Critical response[change | change source]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic5/5 stars[94]

John Lannert of Billboard believed that Amor Prohibido "firmly established [Selena] as the preeminent female star in the US Latin market[...]"[4] He also commented that the album showcased songs ranging from rancheras to hip hop music.[4] According to Mario Tarradell of The Dallas Morning News "Selena had conquered the Latin pop landscape and was poised to crossover to mainstream" after the release of Amor Prohibido.[95] Frank Hoffmann wrote in his book Encyclopedia of recorded sound, Volume 1 that Amor Prohibido had "demonstrated the band's wide range of styles[...]" while also stating that "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" was a "reggae-inflected dance flare", "Fotos y Recuerdos" was a "hard-edge rock" song, while ending his review with naming "No Me Queda Más" as a "touchy ballad". Stephen Thomas Erlewine of Allmusic complained that Amor Prohibido was "slightly uneven" however he then stated that "[Selena] is a dynamic, charismatic singer and is able to pull off the weaker material".[94] He ended his review stating that the album was Selena's strongest and is the reason why she was the biggest Tejano star of the '90s.[94] During Erlewine's review of Dreaming of You (1995) he stated that Amor Prohibido was a more "consistent release".[94] Erlewine also stated that Amor Prohibido was an "introduction and showed why she was so beloved by Tejano fans".[94]

Ed Morales wrote in his book The Latin Beat: The Rhythms and Roots of Latin Music from Bossa Nova to Salsa and Beyond that much of the album was recorded in the "minimalist Tejano style".[96] He also noted that there were "[...] hints of a subtle evolution in her music."[96] Ending his review, Morales stated that the only disappointment in the album was that it was leading to Selena's "best works", which Selena didn't get to do.[96] Herón Márquez wrote in his book Latin Sensations that Amor Prohibido was a "landmark".[86] James McConnachie wrote in his book The Rough Guide to World Music that the album captures Selena's "sex appeal" and that the album had the most "authentically Tejano sound".[97] Spin magazine named Amor Prohibido the "most interesting" album out of Dreaming of You and 12 Super Exitos.[98] Ramiro Burr wrote in his book The Billboard guide to Tejano and regional Mexican music that he believed Amor Prohibido was Selena's and Los Dinos "crowning achievement".[99] Burr also commented that the album had hit the right keys for "pop potential" and believed that the album was the bands most creative work.[99] Michael Clark of Houston Chronicle wrote that "[...] she and Los Dinos took Tejano to an unprecedented level of mainstream success with the 1994 release of Amor Prohibido. A.B. added even more world-music flourishes to songs like "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom", "Fotos y Recuerdos", "No Me Queda Mas" and the title track, which all became No. 1 singles on Billboard's Latin charts."[87]

Artwork[change | change source]

Legacy[change | change source]

"Amor Prohibido" continue to receive extensive airplay in South Texas and at Tejano nightclubs.[100]

Track listing[change | change source]

No. TitleWriter(s) Length
1. "Amor Prohibido"  A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Astudillo 2:49
2. "No Me Queda Más"  Ricky Vela 3:17
3. "Cobarde"  José Luis Borrego 2:50
4. "Fotos y Recuerdos"  Chrissy Hynde, Ricky Vela 2:33
5. "El Chico Del Apartamento 512"  A.B. Quintanilla III, Ricky Vela 3:28
6. "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom"  Selena Quintanilla, Pete Astudillo 3:25
7. "Techno Cumbia"  A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Astudillo 3:43
8. "Tus Desprecios"  A.B. Quintanilla III, Ricky Vela 3:24
9. "Si Una Vez"  A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Astudillo 2:42
10. "Ya No"  A.B. Quintanilla III, Ricky Vela 3:56
20 Years of Music Version
No. TitleWriter(s) Length
11. "Donde Quiera Que Estés" (duet with Barrio Boyzz)K. C. Porter, Miguel Flores, Desmond Child 4:29
12. "Spoken Liner Notes" (This track includes spoken words by Selena's family, friends, and band)Brain "Red" Moore 23:56
13. "Amor Prohibido (music video)"  A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Astudillo 2:50
14. "No Me Queda Más (music video)"  Ricky Vela 3:49

Personnel[change | change source]

Credits are taken from the album's liner notes.[53]

Managerial
Performance credits
Visuals and imagery
Instruments
Technical and production

Charts[change | change source]

Singles charts[change | change source]

Certifications[change | change source]

Awards and nominations[change | change source]

Release history[change | change source]

1994[change | change source]

2002[change | change source]

See also[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Album Credits". Amazon.com. 24 September 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2010.
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  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Miguel, Guadalupe San (3002). Tejano proud: Tex-Mex music in the twentieth century. Texas A&M University Press. p. 110. Retrieved 14 August 2011. More than one of |pages= and |page= specified (help); Check date values in: |year= (help)
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 John Lannert (1995). "A Retrospective". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 107 (23): 112. http://books.google.com/books?id=0QsEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA62&dq=amor+prohibido&hl=en&ei=UHxIToDUNcujtgfC15HHCg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CEEQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=amor%20prohibido&f=false. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  5. "Album Credits". Barnes & Noble. 2010-08-23. Retrieved 2010-08-23.
  6. "Amor Prohibido awarded "Pop Ballad of the Year" and "Regional Mexican Song of The Year" by Lo Nuestro". Univision. 25 August 2010. Retrieved 25 August 2010.
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  40. Richard Harrington (27 April 1995). "SELENA'S MURDER SPURS ALBUM SALES". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  41. 41.0 41.1 41.2 Quintanilla-Perez, Selena; Quintanilla, A.B. (1994). "Amor Prohibido: Selena Digital Sheet Music". Musicnotes.com (Musicnotes)|format= requires |url= (help). Alfred Music Publishing. MN092893 (Product Number). Missing or empty |url= (help); |access-date= requires |url= (help) Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "music" defined multiple times with different content
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  44. John Lannert (1995). "Selena Enters The Latin Music Hall of Fame". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 107 (23): 112. http://books.google.com/books?id=0QsEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA58&dq=Fotos+y+Recuerdos+Awards&hl=en&ei=JWBJTsDMJc-1twfW8vHFDg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Fotos%20y%20Recuerdos%20Awards&f=false. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
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Further reading[change | change source]

External links[change | change source]

Preceded by
Mi Tierra by Gloria Estefan
Top Latin Albums number-one album
June 11, 1994 - June 19, 1994 (first run)
July 2, 1994 (second run)
September 30, 1994 (third run)
April 15, 1995 - July 29, (fourth run)
Succeeded by
Dreaming of You by Selena