Valencian language

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Valencian
valencià
Pronunciation[valensiˈa] or [ba-]
Native toSpain
RegionValencia, Murcia (Carche)
See also geographic distribution of Catalan
EthnicityValencians
Native speakers
2.4 million (2004)[1]
Catalan orthography (Latin script)
Official status
Official language in
In Spain: Template:Country data Valencian Community
Regulated byAcadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua
Language codes
ISO 639-3
GlottologNone
Extensió del valencià al País Valencià.svg
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Valencian (valencià) is the historical, traditional, and official name used in the Valencian Community (Spain) for the language spoken in this region, also known as Catalan (català) in the Spanish Autonomous Communities of Catalonia, Aragon and the Balearic Islands; in the country of Andorra; in the southern French region of the Roussillon; and in the Italian city of Alghero on the island of Sardinia.

In linguistics "Valencian" is also used to identify this distinctive variant spoken in central and southern Valencia which has gained its own currency within the Catalan domain.

References[change | change source]

  1. Míriam Luján; Carlos D. Martínez; Vicente Alabau, Evaluation of several Maximum Likelihood Linear Regression variants for language adaptation (PDF), Proceedings of the sixth international conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, LREC 2008, the total number of people who speak Catalan is 7,200,000, (...). The Valencian dialect is spoken by 27% of all Catalan speakers. citing Vilajoana, Jordi, and Damià Pons. 2001. Catalan, Language of Europe. Generalitat de Catalunya, Department de Cultura. Govern de les Illes Balears, Conselleria d’Educació i Cultura.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Some Iberian scholars may alternatively classify Catalan as Iberian Romance/East Iberian.
  3. Wheeler 2006.