Vanessa Nakate

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Vanessa Nakate
Vanessa Nakate.jpg
Born (1996-11-15) 15 November 1996 (age 26)
Uganda
EducationMakerere University Business School
Years active2018–present
Known forClimate activism

Vanessa Nakate (born 15 November 1996) is a Ugandan climate justice activist.[1] She grew up in Kampala. She became a celebrity in December 2018 after becoming concerned about the unusually high temperatures in her country.[2]

Early life[change | change source]

Nakate grew up in the Ugandan capital, Kampala neighborhood.[3] Nakate graduated with a business administration in marketing degree. It was from Makerere University Business School.[4]

Actions for the climate[change | change source]

She was inspired by Greta Thunberg to start her own climate movement in Uganda. She began a solo strike against inaction on the climate crisis in January 2019.[5] For several months, she was the lone protester outside of the gates of the Parliament of Uganda.[4] Eventually, other youth began to respond to her calls on social media for others. Others helped her to draw attention to the rescue of the Congolian rainforests.[6] Nakate founded the Youth for Future Africa. She also founded the Africa-based Rise Up Movement.[7]

In December 2019, Nakate was one of a handful of youth activists to speak at the COP25 in Spain.[8]

In early January 2020, she joined around 20 other youth climate activists from around the world. She published a letter to participants at the World Economic Forum in Davos. She called on companies, banks and governments to immediately stop using fossil fuels.[9] She was one of five international delegates invited by Arctic Basecamp. She camped with them in Davos during the World Economic Forum. The delegates later joined a climate march on the last day of the Forum.[10]

In October 2020, Nakate gave a speech at the Desmond Tutu International Peace Lecture. She asked the world leaders to "wake up" and recognise climate change as a crisis, tying it to poverty, hunger, disease, conflict and violence against women and girls. "Climate change is a nightmare that affects every sector of our lives," she said. "How can we eradicate poverty without looking at this crisis? How can we achieve zero hunger if climate change is leaving millions of people with nothing to eat? We are going to see disaster after disaster, challenge after challenge, suffering after suffering (...) if nothing is done about this." She also called for leaders to “leave their comfort zones and see the danger we are in and do something about it. This is a matter of life and death.”[11]

Nakate started the Green Schools Project. It is a renewable energy initiative. It aims to transition schools in Uganda to solar energy and install eco-friendly stoves in these schools.[12] As of now, the project has carried out installations in six schools.[13]

On 9 July 2020, Vanessa Nakate was interviewed by Angelina Jolie hosted by Time magazine. It was about the power and importance of African voices in the climate justice movement.[14] In August, Jeune Afrique magazine named her among the "Top 100 most influential Africans".[15] In August 2020, Vanessa Nakate joined former UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon at the Forum Alpbach to discuss climate activism.[16]

In September, Vanessa spoke on a panel entitled “Sparking an Era of Transformational Climate Leadership”. It was for the World Resources Institute. She talked of her perspective in “Conversations with Climate Changers” for Oxfam.[17] Vanessa Nakate was announced by the United Nations as the SDG 13 young leader in 2020.[18][19] Nakate was shown among OkayAfrica's 100 Women. It is an exclusive platform to pay respect to 100 women of excellence among the diaspora during Women's History Month.[20] Nakate was mentioned among the most influential young Africans in 2020 by YouthLead.[21] Nakate was a keynote speaker at the Berlin Energy Transition Dialogue 2021 on 16 March 2021.[22][23] Her speeches included criticism of the German Federal Foreign Office as organizers for screening the input from youth climate activists. It was not applied to other invited speakers.[24]

She was writing in The Guardian in October 2021. She argues that the countries and corporations largely responsible for greenhouse emissions should compensate African countries and communities for the loss and damage arising from climate change that they are now suffering.[25]

In a 2019 interview with Amy Goodman for Democracy Now!, Nakate expressed her motivation for climate action: "My country heavily depends on agriculture, therefore most of the people depend on agriculture. So, if our farms are destroyed by floods, if the farms are destroyed by droughts and crop production is less, that means that the price of food is going to go high. So it will only be the most privileged who will be able to buy food. And they are the biggest emitters in our countries, the ones who will be able to survive the crisis of food, whereas most of the people who live in villages and rural communities, they have trouble getting food because of the high prices. And this leads to starvation and death. Literally, in my county, a lack of rain means starvation and death for the less privileged".[26]

Awards[change | change source]

Nakate was given the Haub law environmental 2021 Award. It was in recognition of her citizen diplomacy in bringing the voice of her generation to global environmental campaigns. She was recognised for her inspiring climate activism in Uganda and beyond.[27][28]

Vanessa Nakate was honoured by 2020 Young Activists Summit During a Live Discussion on Post-COVID-19 World.[29]

Nakate was on the list of the BBC's 100 Women announced on 23 November 2020.[30]

She was also on the list Time100 Next published by TIME magazine on 17 February 2021,[31] She is shown on the cover of TIME's November 8/November 15, 2021 issue.[32]

Bibliography[change | change source]

  • Nakate, Vanessa (28 October 2021). A bigger picture: my fight to bring a new African voice to the climate crisis. London, United Kingdom: Pan Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-3586-5450-6. Hardback edition indicated, 256 pages.

References[change | change source]

  1. Urra, Susana; Kitson, Melissa (6 December 2019). "'Greta Thunberg in Madrid: "I hope world leaders grasp the urgency of the climate crisis"". El País. Archived from the original on 24 December 2019. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  2. Hanson, James (28 October 2019). "3 young black climate activists in Africa trying to save the world". Greenpeace UK. Archived from the original on 25 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  3. Dahir, Abdi Latif (2021-05-07). "Erased From a Davos Photo, a Ugandan Climate Activist Is Back in the Picture". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 7 May 2021. Retrieved 7 May 2021.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Kisakye, Frank (30 May 2019). "22-year-old Nakate takes on lone climate fight". The Observer. Archived from the original on 22 September 2019. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  5. Feder, J. Lester; Hirji, Zahra; Müller, Pascale (7 February 2019). "A Huge Climate Change Movement Led By Teenage Girls Is Sweeping Europe. And It's Coming To The US Next". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on 19 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  6. Jenkins, Carla (25 November 2019). "Glasgow student follows Greta Thunberg with 30 day climate crisis strike". Glasgow Times. Archived from the original on 25 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  7. Bort, Ryan (23 January 2020). "A Rolling Stone Roundtable With the Youth Climate Activists Fighting for Change in Davos". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 24 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  8. "Climate change: What's Greta been saying at the COP25 conference in Madrid?". BBC. 7 December 2019. Archived from the original on 28 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  9. Thunberg, Greta (10 January 2020). "At Davos we will tell world leaders to abandon the fossil fuel economy". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 25 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  10. Sengupta, Somini (24 January 2020). "Greta Thunberg Joins Climate March on Her Last Day in Davos". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 25 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  11. "'Wake up': Climate activist Nakate challenges world leaders". The Independent. 7 October 2019. Archived from the original on 17 October 2020. Retrieved 15 October 2020.
  12. "The Green Schools Project: Vanessa Nakate is on a mission to power schools in Uganda with solar energy". CleanTech News. 12 August 2019. Archived from the original on 18 October 2020. Retrieved 15 October 2020.
  13. Vanessa Nakate [@vanessa_vash] (14 October 2020). "I wanted to drive a transition to renewable energy and provide energy saving cooking stoves for schools in the rural communities. As of now, we have carried out installations in six schools and we look forward to carrying out two more installations" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  14. "A Conversation with Angelina Jolie and Ugandan Climate Activist Vanessa Nakate On the Urgency of Elevating African Voices in Climate Discussions". Time.com. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  15. "[Classement] Les 100 Africains les plus influents en 2020 – Jeune Afrique". JeuneAfrique.com. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  16. "European Forum Alpbach". Archived from the original on 2022-03-28. Retrieved 2022-05-03.
  17. "Climate Action 2.0: Sparking an Era of Transformational Climate Leadership". Wri.org. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  18. "Meet the 2020 Class of Young Leaders for the SDGs – Office of the Secretary-General's Envoy on Youth". Un.org. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  19. "Vanessa Nakate – Office of the Secretary-General's Envoy on Youth". Un.org. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  20. "Vanessa Nakate". 100women.okayafrica.com. Archived from the original on 22 October 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  21. "100 Most Influential Young Africans for 2020". Youthlead.org. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  22. "Berlin Energy Transition Dialogue 2021 — Speakers". Berlin Energy Transition Dialogue 2021. Berlin, Germany: Germany Federal Foreign Office. 16 March 2021. Archived from the original on 11 March 2021. Retrieved 2021-03-16.
  23. Nakate, Vanessa (16 March 2021). Keynote presentation at Berlin Energy Transition Dialogue 2021. Berlin, Germany: German Federal Foreign Office. Event occurs at 1:26:25. Retrieved 2021-03-17. Circa 4 minutes long.
  24. von Jutrczenka, Bernd (16 March 2021). "Ugandan activist Vanessa Nakate accuses climate conference organizers of censorship". The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Canada. ISSN 0319-0714. Retrieved 2021-10-30.
  25. Nakate, Vanessa (29 October 2021). "We know who caused the climate crisis — but they don't want to pay for it". The Guardian. London, United Kingdom. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2021-10-29.
  26. Nakate, Vanessa (12 December 2019). "Uganda's First Fridays for Future Climate Striker, Vanessa Nakate, Joins COP25 Protests in Madrid". Democracy Now! (Interview). Interviewed by Amy Goodman. Archived from the original on 30 December 2019. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  27. "Haub Law Announces two recipients of the 2021 Elisabeth Haub Award for Environmental Law and Diplomacy | Pace Law School". Law.pace.edu. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  28. "Elisabeth Haub Award for Environmental Law and Diplomacy | Pace Law School". Law.pace.edu. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  29. "Vanessa Nakate and Six Other Young Activists Honoured by 2020 Young Activists Summit During a Live Discussion on Post-COVID-19 World, Bringing Together Over 8,600 People from Around 100 Countries". Agilitypr.news. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  30. "BBC 100 Women 2020: Who is on the list this year?". BBC News. 2020-11-23. Archived from the original on 23 November 2020. Retrieved 2020-11-23.
  31. "2021 TIME100 Next: Vanessa Nakate". Time. Archived from the original on 17 February 2021. Retrieved 2021-02-17.
  32. "Vanessa Nakate Wants Climate Justice for Africa". Time. Retrieved 2021-11-01.