Vought F4U Corsair

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F4U Corsair
A restored F4U-4 Corsair in Korean War-era U.S. Marine Corps markings
Role Carrier-based fighter-bomber
National origin United States
Manufacturer Chance Vought
First flight 29 May 1940
Introduction 28 December 1942
Retired 1953 (United States)
1979 (Honduras)
Primary users United States Navy
United States Marine Corps
Royal Navy
Royal New Zealand Air Force
Produced 1942–53
Number built 12,571
Variants Goodyear F2G Corsair

The Vought F4U Corsair was a fighter aircraft that fought in World War II and the Korean War. Vought could not keep up with demand for the aircraft, so Goodyear and Brewster made them.[1] It has longest production run of any piston-engined fighter in U.S. history (1942–1953).[2][3][4]

The Corsair was used by the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marines, Fleet Air Arm and the Royal New Zealand Air Force, as well as the French Navy Aéronavale and other, smaller, air forces. It became the most capable carrier-based fighter-bomber of World War II. Some Japanese pilots said it was the best American fighter of World War II,[5] and the U.S. Navy reported an 11:1 kill ratio.[6] As well as being a great fighter, the Corsair proved to be an excellent fighter-bomber.[7]

References[change | change source]

  1. Shettle 2001, p. 107.
  2. O'Leary 1980, p. 116.
  3. Donald 1995, p. 244.
  4. Wilson 1996.
  5. Jablonski 1979, p. 171.
  6. Donald 1995, p. 246.
  7. Pilot's Manual 1979, Prologue.