Yaduvanshi caste

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Yaduvanshi is a Sub-caste of Ahirs found in India and Nepal[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9] the Yaduvanshi Yadavs are the 'real' Ahirs. they are Kshatriyas and valorous soldiers.[10] The Ahirs claim to be real Yaduvanshi (Yadavas), the direct descendants of Lord Krishna.[11] The Yaduvanshi is one of the sub-divisions of Chandravanshi kshatriya. In Vedic books of ancient times there is no mentioning of Rajputs. In fact the Rajput Community did not exist during king Yadu's life time nor till many centuries afterwards. The Rajputs actually originated in the 16th century.

Yaduvanshi caste
ReligionsVaishnavism
Related groupsYadav/Ahir/Abhira/Krishnavanshi

The regions where the Yaduvanshi clan settled is not certain, but certain scholars suggest that Yaduvanshi clan inherited the territories to the south-west of the Gangetic plains, between the Chambal River, Betwa and Ken, which correspond to the border areas of present Indian states of Haryana, Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh. Yaduvanshis of badaun came from Hansi and Hisar [The descendants of Yadu tribe (Yaduvanshi) include Krishna. Yadu-Dynasty belongs to the family deriving from Soma, identified with the moon god Chandra.Yaduvanshi Kshatriyas were originally "Ahirs".[12]

Yaduvanshi of U.P.[change | change source]

The Yaduvanshi Ahirs of U.P. have traditionally viewed themselves as a local warrior caste and continue to promote that im-age of themselves.[13]

References[change | change source]

  1. The Asiatic Journal and Monthly Register for British India and Its Dependencies. Black, Parbury, & Allen. 1826. The superior classes consist of the descendants of Yaduvansi Ahírs.
  2. Elliot, Sir Henry Miers (1845). Supplement to the Glossary of Indian Terms. Printed at the Secundra Orphan Press by N.H. Longden. This pastoral tribe of the Yadubnsee stock was formerly of much greater consideration in India than it is at present . In the " Ramayana" and "Mahabharat" the Abhiras in the West are spoken of; and in the Puranic Geography the country on the Western coast of Inuia, from the Tapti to Devagurh is called Abhira, or the region of Cowherds.
  3. Watson, John Forbes; Kaye, Sir John William (1868). The People of India: A Series of Photographic Illustrations, with Descriptive Letterpress, of the Races and Tribes of Hindustan, Originally Prepared Under the Authority of the Government of India, and Reproduced by Order of the Secretary of State for India in Council. India Museum. The three races are the Nand - bansa (race ), Jad-or Yadu- bansa, and Gwal-(Gowala, cowherd) bansa.
  4. Kitts, Eustace John (1885). A Compendium of the Castes and Tribes Found in India: Compiled from the (1881) Census Reports for the Various Provinces (excluding Burmah) and Native States of the Empire. Printed at the Education Society's Press, Byculla. The Ahirs, for example, contain three well-known subdivisions, the Jadubans, the Nandbans and the Gwalbans.
  5. Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain & Ireland. 1899. the Ahir are still divided into great, and quite independent, sections—Jadubansi, Nandabansi, and Gwālbansi.
  6. Proceedings - Punjab History Conference. Department of Punjab Historical Studies, Punjabi University. 2006. ISBN 978-81-302-0094-1. Ahirs were divided into three sub-castes Nandbansi, Jadubansi and Gualbansi.
  7. Soni, Lok Nath (2000). The Cattle and the Stick: An Ethnographic Profile of the Raut of Chhattisgarh. Anthropological Survey of India, Government of India, Ministry of Tourism and Culture, Department of Culture. ISBN 978-81-85579-57-3. the Abhira were divided into thirty-six lineage groups. It has also been described in 'Nagvansa' written by Pradyumn Singh (quoted by Singh 1945), as thirty-six' Kuris. It shows that the Abhira are the Kshatriya and were called both Kshatriya and Rajput. the Yadubansi Kshatriyas were originally Ahirs". In the old literature thirty-six sections of the Kshatriya caste have been mentioned'. Chand Bardai, a Kshatriya, was one of the eminent persons in the Prithviraj Chauhan's cabinet and a well-known poet, who has written "Prithviraj Raso". At one place, he has mentioned the 'Abhira' as a section of the Kshatriya caste. The above writings show that the Abhira is a section of Kshatriya caste. This is also confirmed by Shakti Sangam Tantra which says "Those who are begotten by king Ahuk, are Abhira". Jati Vivekadhyayo also confirms this conception and mentions that "those who are born in the Ahuk lineage, are called Abhira".
  8. Singh, K. S. (1998). India's Communities. Anthropological Survey of India. ISBN 978-0-19-563354-2. The Ahir are divided into three groups of equal status, namely Yaduvanshi, Gwalvanshi and Nandvanshi.
  9. The Madras Monthly Journal of Medical Science. Gantz Brothers, Adelphi Press. 1871.
  10. Michelutti, Lucia (2020-11-29). The Vernacularisation of Democracy: Politics, Caste and Religion in India. Taylor & Francis. ISBN 978-1-000-08400-9. the Yaduvanshi Yadavs are the 'real' Ahirs. they are Kshatriyas and valorous soldiers.
  11. RE; Review of Ethnology. E. Stiglmayr. 1974.
  12. Soni, Lok Nath (2000). The Cattle and the Stick: An Ethnographic Profile of the Raut of Chhattisgarh. Anthropological Survey of India, Government of India, Ministry of Tourism and Culture, Department of Culture. ISBN 978-81-85579-57-3.
  13. Beissinger, Margaret; Tylus, Jane; Wofford, Susanne; Wofford, Susanne Lindgren (1999-03-31). Epic Traditions in the Contemporary World: The Poetics of Community. University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-21038-7. The Ahirs of U.P. have traditionally viewed themselves as a local warrior caste and continue to promote that im- age of themselves.