Zhou Youguang

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Zhou in the 1920s

Zhou Youguang (Chou Yu-kuang; Chinese: 周有光; pinyin: Zhōu Yǒuguāng; Wade–Giles: Chou1 Yu3-kuang1; born Zhou Yaoping (Chinese: 周耀平; pinyin: Zhōu Yàopíng; Wade–Giles: Chou1 Yao4-p'ing2); 13 January 1906 – 14 January 2017) was a Chinese linguist and writer. He was sometimes called the "father of Hanyu Pinyin".[1][2] Hanyu Pinyin is the official romanization of Chinese in the People's Republic of China. He also wrote many books banned by the government of China.

Zhou was born in Changzhou, Jiangsu. In 1933, he married Zhang Yunhe. She died on 14 August 2002. They had two children together Zhou Xiaoping (1934–2015) and Zhou Xiaohe (1935–1941). He turned 100 in 2006. He became a supercentenarian (turning 110) in 2016.

Zhou died on 14 January 2017 at his home in Beijing, a day after his 111th birthday.[3][4]

References[change | change source]

  1. Branigan, Tania (21 February 2008). "Sound Principles". The Guardian. United Kingdom. Retrieved 5 March 2014.
  2. Swofford, Mark (11 July 2009). "Meeting Zhou Yougang". PinyinInfo. Retrieved 5 March 2014.
  3. ""汉语拼音之父"周有光去世 享年112岁". sina.com.cn (in Chinese). 14 January 2017. Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  4. Associated Press (14 January 2017). "Zhou Youguang, Father of Chinese Romanization System, Dies". ABC News. American Broadcasting Company. Retrieved 14 January 2017.

Other websites[change | change source]