Österreichischer Fußball- Bund

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Leo Windtner – president of the ÖFB

The Austrian Football Association (ÖFB) (German: Österreichischer Fußball-Bund) is the highest body of football in Austria. It organizes the football league Austrian Bundesliga, the Austrian Cup and the Austrian national team, and the same items in women's football. It is based in Vienna.

In 2010 501,685 male and female players are organized into 2,256 teams. This number makes the ÖFB the largest sport organisation in Austria.

History[change | change source]

In 1894. the first football club was founded, and 10 years later the Österreichischer Fußball-Bund (Austrian Football Association). Until 1904, the Österreichische Fußball-Union was the leading body in Austrian football, but it dissolved after the foundation of the ÖFB. In 1905 it became a member of FIFA. In 1908 the ÖFB was host for the fifth FIFA-congress. Since 1954 the ÖFB has also been a member of the UEFA.

The time before the Second World War was the most successful for the ÖFB. Between 1930 and 1933 the so-called Wunderteam (miracle team) won 14 matches. In 1934 they reached fourth place in the FIFA World Cup. The Austrian team won the silver medal in the Olympic football tournament in Berlin. Also, after the Second World War, Austria played in different FIFA-World Cups: 1954, 1958, 1978, 1982, 1990, and 1998. The most successful World Cup was 1954 with third place. The last international tournament was the UEFA Euro 2008 which was hosted by Austria and Switzerland.

Regional organizations[change | change source]

  • Burgenländischer Fußball-Verband (BFV)
  • Niederösterreichischer Fußball-Verband (NOEFV)
  • Oberösterreichischer Fußball-Verband (OOEFV)
  • Salzburger Fußball-Verband (SFV)
  • Steirischer Fußballverband (StFV)
  • Tiroler Fußball-Verband (TFV)
  • Vorarlberger Fußball-Verband (VFV)
  • Wiener Fußball-Verband (WFV)
  • Kärntner Fußball-Verband (KFV)

List of coaches of the Austrian team[change | change source]

Hugo Meisl
Heinrich Retschury
Herbert Prohaska
Hans Krankl
Dietmar Constantini
  • Hugo Meisl 1912–14
  • Heinrich Retschury 1914–1919
  • Hugo Meisl 1919–1937 ("Wunderteam")
  • Heinrich Retschury 1937–1938
  • Between 1938 and 1945 Austria was occupied by Germany
  • Karl Zankl 1945
  • Edi Bauer 1945–1948
  • Eduard Frühwirth 1948
  • Walter Nausch 1948–1954 (third place World Cup 1954)
  • Hans Kaulich 1954–1955
  • Josef Molzer 1955
  • Karl Geyer 1955–1956
  • Josef Argauer and Josef Molzer 1956–1958
  • Alfred Frey, Franz Putzendopler, Egon Selzer, and Josef Molzer 1958
  • Karl Decker 1958–1964
  • Josef Walter and Béla Guttmann 1964
  • Eduard Frühwirth 1964–1967
  • Erwin Alge and Hans Pesser 1967–1968
  • Leopold Šťastný 1968–1975
  • Branko Elsner 1975
  • Helmut Senekowitsch 1976–1978
  • Karl Stotz 1978–1981
  • Georg Schmidt and Felix Latzke 1982
  • Erich Hof 1982–1985
  • Branko Elsner 1985–1987
  • Josef Hickersberger 1988–1990
  • Alfred Riedl 1990–1991
  • Dietmar Constantini 1991 (caretaker)
  • Ernst Happel 1992
  • Dietmar Constantini 1992 (caretaker)
  • Herbert Prohaska 1993–1999
  • Otto Baric 1999–2001
  • Hans Krankl 2002–2005
  • Willibald Ruttensteiner, Andreas Herzog, and Slavko Kovacic 2005 (caretaker)
  • Josef Hickersberger 2006–2008
  • Karel Brückner 2008–2009
  • Dietmar Constantini 2009–2011
  • Willibald Ruttensteiner 2011 (caretaker)
  • Marcel Koller 2011-