Chemical weapons in World War I

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A poison gas attack using gas cylinders in World War I.

Chemical weapons were a major part of World War I. It was the first time that chemical weapons was widely used in warfare. Noxious smokes and fumes had been used for centuries without much success. During World War One the German Empire learned to use poison gas effectively. Their attacks with chlorine caused severe coughing fits. Coughing was followed by choking and then the victims would drown on their own fluids. Fritz Haber, a leading German chemist, led the development effort. The gas was released from big gas canisters. The gas was very harmful to both sides because the gas would often blow back into the attackers front lines. For this reason the use of gas was feared by both sides.

In the later parts of the war different kinds of gas were used. Phosgene gas would damage the lungs and cause them to fill with mucus. This then caused the victims to drown. Mustard gas was also used. This was the most feared gas. Mustard gas gets its name because it smells like mustard. This gas would not kill people immediately, Instead it would make the eyes water, cause their skin to blister and damage the lungs. This would then result in deadly diseases. Masks were used to stop the gas by preventing it from traveling to the lungs. The first masks were big and clumsy. This caused them to be hated. The masks did not protect against the mustard gas.

Only two percent of the deaths in World War I were caused by gas.[source?] Over 80,000 men died the first time gas was used.[source?] Gas did not have an affect on the war's outcome.