Golden eagle

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Golden eagle
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Class: Aves
Order: Accipitriformes
Family: Accipitridae
Genus: Aquila
Binomial name
Aquila chrysaetos
Linnaeus, 1758
Light green = Breeding only
Blue = Wintering only
Dark green = All-year

The golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is one of the best-known birds of prey in the northern hemisphere. It is the most widely distributed species of eagle. Golden eagles use their agility and speed combined with powerful feet and massive, sharp talons to snatch up prey. They eat hares, rabbits, marmots and other ground squirrels.

Once common across the Holarctic, it has gone from many areas heavily populated by humans. The species is still widespread. It lives in Eurasia, North America, and parts of North Africa.

Like all eagles, it belongs to the family Accipitridae. It is one of the largest birds of prey in North America; only the bald eagle and California condor get larger. Golden eagles also live in the Scottish Highlands.

Related pages[change | change source]

The formidable foot and talons of a golden eagle