Para-Nordic skiing

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Para-Nordic skiing is a type of skiing for people with disabilities. It includes two sports. They are cross country skiing and biathlon. Both sports are for blind people and people with physical disabilities.

Biathlon[change | change source]

Biathlon uses the same rules created by the International Biathlon Association (IBU). Some changes have been made to the rules by the International Paralympic Nordic Skiing Committee (IPNNC).[1]

Biathlon is two sports combined. These sports are shooting and cross country skiing.[1] Biathlon has several types of races. They are 7.5 km, 12.5 km, and pursuit.[1] During the race, people shoot their guns two to four times.[1] Each time they shoot, they take five shots.[1] Depending on the competition, there are two different consequences for missing. They may get a points penalty. They may have to ski a penalty distance.[1]

Blind people and people with physical disabilities compete in the biathlon. People with physical disabilities are separated into two groups. These are standing skiers and sitting skiers.[1]

Blind people use a special electro-acoustic firing system. Their helmets have a wireless connection with their weapons. Using their headphones, they can locate the target. The closer their weapon is aimed at the target, the louder the sound.[1]

Cross country skiing[change | change source]

The rules for cross country skiing are similar to the ones created by International Ski Federation (FIS). They have been modified by the International Para Nordic Skiing Committee (IPNNC).[1] Blind people and people with physical disabilities compete in cross country skiing. People with physical disabilities are separated into two groups. These are standing skiers and sitting skiers.[1] People with physical disabilities who ski while standing are classified from LW2 to LW9.[1] People with physical disabilities who use a sit ski are classified from LW10 to LW12.[1] People who are blind are classified from B1 to B3.[1] People who are blind use a guide skier. Guide skiers tell a blind skier which direction to ski.[1]

Because people with different types of disabilities ski against each other, a system has been created to make the results more fair. The person with the best time does not always win. Instead, the finishing time is multiplied against a percentage. The percentage is based on how difficult a person's disability makes it to ski. The time multiplied by the percentages gives a new time result. This new time is used to determine who wins a race.[1]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 "Zimowe dyscypliny Paraolimpijskie". Polski Komitet Paraolimpijski (in Polish). Retrieved 20 February 2018.