Amiga

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Amiga 500 equipments

The Amiga was a line of personal computers that Commodore International produced during the 1980s and early 1990s. The first Amiga computer, the Amiga 1000, possessed a HAM mode enabled the machine to display 4096 colors, a chip that enabled it to play back four channels of stereo at once, an operating system with multitasking, and a graphical user interface at a time that these features were uncommon or not as developed as Amiga's.[1][2] The Amiga is often said to had been ahead of its time.[3][4] Although the Amiga did not sale well and Commodore went bankrupted, the Amiga developed a fandom and niche amongst video and graphics enthusiasts and gamers.[5][6]

The Amiga was initially created by computer chip designer Jay Miner and Hi-Toro (later Amiga Corporation).[7] In 1984, Commodore purchased Amiga Corporation.[8][9] The first Amiga, the Amiga 1000, was released in 1985 after delays and marketing blunders.[10][11] In 1994, Commodore declared bankruptcy.

References[change | edit source]

  1. Reimer, Jeremy (2007-08-13). "A history of the Amiga, part 2: The birth of Amiga". Ars Technica. p. 2. http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2007/08/a-history-of-the-amiga-part-2/. Retrieved 2013-01-23.
  2. Reimer, Jeremy (2007-08-22). "A history of the Amiga, part 3: The first prototype". Ars Technica. p. 2. http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2007/08/a-history-of-the-amiga-part-3/2/. Retrieved 2013-01-25.
  3. Kahney, Leander (2000-03-20). "Amiga Back From the Dead Again". Wired. http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/news/2000/03/34922. Retrieved 2013-01-25.
  4. Davis, Jim (1999-07-09). "Gateway's Amiga prepares for return". CNET News. http://news.cnet.com/2100-1040-228256.html. Retrieved 2013-01-25.
  5. Jeremy Reimer (2005-01-17). "The Micro-AmigaOne and Amiga OS4 Developer Prerelease (Update 1)". Ars Technica. p. 1. http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2005/01/amiga/. Retrieved 23 January 2013.
  6. Shah, Agam (2012-03-22). "Amiga Computer Awakened From Sleep With Makeover". PCWorld. http://www.pcworld.com/article/252392/amiga_computer_awakened_from_sleep_with_makeover.html. Retrieved 23 January 2013.
  7. Reimer, Jeremy (2007-08-13). "A history of the Amiga, part 2: The birth of Amiga". Ars Technica. p. 1. http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2007/08/a-history-of-the-amiga-part-2/. Retrieved 2013-01-23.
  8. Reimer, Jeremy (2007-08-22). "A history of the Amiga, part 3: The first prototype". Ars Technica. p. 3. http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2007/08/a-history-of-the-amiga-part-3/3/. Retrieved 2013-01-25.
  9. Reimer, Jeremy (2007-10-22). "A history of the Amiga, part 4: Enter Commodore". Ars Technica. p. 1. http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2007/10/amiga-history-4-commodore-years/. Retrieved 2013-01-25.
  10. Reimer, Jeremy (2007-12-10). "A history of the Amiga, part 5: postlaunch blues". Ars Technica. p. 1. http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2007/12/amiga-history-part-5/. Retrieved 2013-01-25.
  11. Reimer, Jeremy (2007-12-10). "A history of the Amiga, part 5: postlaunch blues". Ars Technica. p. 2. http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2007/12/amiga-history-part-5/. Retrieved 2013-01-25.

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