Archivist

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An Archivist surveying an unprocessed collection of materials. Surveying is commonly done to determine priorities for preservation and/or conservation of materials before an archivist begins arrangement and description.

An archivist is a professional who collects, organizes, preserves, maintains control over, and provides access to information determined to have long-term value. The information maintained by an archivist can be any form of media (photographs, video or sound recordings, letters, documents, electronic records, etc.).

As Richard Pearce-Moses wrote, "Archivists keep records that have enduring value as reliable memories of the past, and they help people find and understand the information they need in those records." [1]

Determining what records have enduring value is not always easy. Archivists must also select records valuable enough to justify the costs of storage and preservation, plus the labor intensive expenses of arrangement, description, and reference service.[2] The theory and scholarly work underpinning archives practices is called archival science.

Footnotes[change | change source]

  1. Pearce-Moses, Richard. "Identity and Diversity: What Is an Archivist?" Archival Outlook, March/April 2006.
  2. Hunter, Gregory (2003). Developing and Maintaining Practical Archives. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc.. http://www.neal-schuman.com/db/3/353.html.

Related pages[change | change source]

English Wiktionary
The English Wiktionary has a dictionary definition (meanings of a word) for: archivist

Other websites[change | change source]