Britpop

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Britpop
Stylistic origins Alternative rock
Merseybeat
Glam rock
Cultural origins early 1990s, United Kingdom
Typical instruments Vocals - Guitar - Bass - drums - Keyboards
Mainstream popularity Popular from the mid-to late 1990s.
Subgenres
New wave of new wave, Lion Pop
Regional scenes
England - Scotland - Wales - Northern Ireland
Other topics
Bands - Cool Britannia - Timeline of alternative rock

Britpop is a type of alternative rock that started in the United Kingdom. Britpop came out of the British independent music scene of the 1990s and affected, or changed, by British guitar pop music of the 1960s and 1970s. This kind of music began as a reaction against some trends, or styles, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, such as grunge from the United States. After American grunge bands such as Nirvana came to Britain, many British bands acted as opposites to the American bands, and wrote about only British topics and concerns.

Britpop bands did not have one type of sound, but the media called them first a 'scene', or short-lasting trend. Later, the media called them a national importance. Blur, Oasis and Pulp have been called the most important bands.[1] Some bands were able to become popular overseas, but Britpop was mostly gone by the end of the decade.

References[change | edit source]

  1. Blur, Oasis and Pulp were the main subjects of John Dower's 2003 documentary Live Forever: The Rise and Fall of Britpop and a review of Different Class recalls the "holy Britpop triumvirate" of Oasis, Blur and Pulp; Garry Mulholland; Q magazine, September 2006; p116