Chinua Achebe

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Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe in 2008
Born Albert Chinụalụmọgụ Achebe
16 November 1930(1930-11-16)
Ogidi, Nigeria Protectorate
Died 22 March 2013 (aged 82)[1]
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Occupation David and Marianna Fisher University Professor and professor of Africana studies Brown University
Nationality Nigerian
Ethnicity Igbo
Period 1958–present
Notable work(s) "The African Trilogy": Things Fall Apart, No Longer at Ease, Arrow of God, A Man of the People and Anthills of the Savannah

Chinua Achebe (16 November 1930 - 22 March 2013) was a Nigerian[2] novelist, poet, professor, and critic. He was best known for writing the novel, Things Fall Apart which was first printed in 1958.[3][4] It is the most widely read book in modern African literature. Achebe went to Nigeria's first university, University College. Achebe wrote his first short story at university.

References[change | change source]

  1. Jonathan Kandell (22 March 2013). "Chinua Achebe, African Literary Titan, Dies at 82". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 22 March 2013. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/23/world/africa/chinua-achebe-nigerian-writer-dies-at-82.html?hp&_r=0&gwh=AB1156C7404B9A96DAFAFB0DB4434ADC. Retrieved 22 March 2013.
  2. Ezenwa-Ohaeto, p. 6.
  3. Franklin, Ruth. "After Empire: Chinua Achebe and the Great African Novel". The New Yorker, 26 May 2008. Retrieved on 7 December 2010.
  4. Ogbaa, p. xv.