Development of the New Testament canon

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The Christian Biblical canon is the set of books in the Bible. Although the Early Church mostly used the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible, the Septuagint or the Targums among Aramaic speakers, the Apostles did not otherwise leave a defined set of new scriptures. However Saint Peter in his letters does refer to Paul's writings, saying: 'the longsuffering of our Lord is salvation; even as our beloved brother Paul also according to the wisdom given unto him hath written unto you; as also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are some things hard to be understood, which they that are unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do the other scriptures, unto their own destruction. (2 Peter 3:15-16) The New Testament as it is today was defined later by the church at the Synod of Hippo in 393 AD.

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