Gutenberg Bible

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Page from a copy of the Gutenberg Bible. The text is printed by movable metal type. The type, influenced by a manuscript style, is not easy to read. The decoration surrounding the text is done by hand.

The Gutenberg Bible (also known as the 42-line Bible or the Mazarin Bible) is a printed version of the Latin Vulgate translation of the Bible that was printed by Johannes Gutenberg, in Mainz, Germany in the 15th century. Although it is not the first book to be printed by Gutenberg's new movable type system[1], it is his major work, and of central importance for the start of the "Gutenberg Revolution" and the "Age of the Printed Book". It is a very rare and expensive book, as only a few copies of it are still around.

The earliest known book with movable type was published 78 years before in Korea and is known as the Jikji.[2]

Related pages[change | change source]

Notes[change | change source]

  1. Man, John. "6". Gutenberg; How one man remade the world with words. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.. pp. 312. ISBN 0471218235.
  2. Memory of the World, unesco.org, accessed November 2009

Other websites[change | change source]

A complete link list of digitized copies can be found in the German Wikipedia.[1]